Political News

Romney wins NC, inches closer to magic number of delegates

Posted May 8, 2012
Updated May 9, 2012

— Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney added to his big lead in the race for convention delegates Tuesday by winning Republican presidential primaries in North Carolina, West Virginia and Indiana, inching closer to the number of delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination.

North Carolina GOP Chairman Robin Hayes said he was "thrilled" by Romney's victory.

"With North Carolina’s unemployment rate remaining at an unacceptably high level, our citizens demand a president who understands how to create an environment where job creators can flourish," Hayes said in a statement. "Governor Romney’s successful business and governing background make him uniquely qualified for the job."

None of the outcomes is a surprise. Romney faces no serious challenge to the Republican nomination.

Even the candidate himself is essentially ignoring Tuesday's primaries. Romney has been spending the day campaigning in Michigan, where he castigated President Barack Obama as an "old-school liberal" whose policies would take the country backward.

Romney won at least 55 delegates Tuesday, with 52 still undecided. Romney has a commanding lead in the race for delegates with 911. He is 233 delegates shy of the 1,144 he needs to clinch the nomination — a gap he could close by the end of the month.

The only other Republican still in the race, Texas Rep. Ron Paul, has 94 delegates.

Romney won all 27 delegates at stake in Indiana and at least 28 of the 52 delegates up for grabs in North Carolina. Voters also went to the polls in West Virginia, with 28 delegates at stake, but delegate results were not expected on election night.

West Virginia elects individual delegates directly on the ballot. Each delegate is listed on the ballot — three in each of the three congressional districts and 19 statewide — along with the presidential candidate they support. With 112 candidates running for the 19 statewide spots, results were expected to be late.

North Carolina awarded delegates in direct proportion to the statewide vote, so Paul should win a few delegates even though he was trailing Romney by 55 percentage points with about 42 percent of the precincts reporting.

Even Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich, who both dropped out of the race, stand to win a few North Carolina delegates because their names were still on the ballot.

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  • davidk_at_unc May 9, 2012

    His two main competitors have dropped out and he STILL only gets 66% of the vote??? HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!

    That's like the football team that finally scores 5 plays after the other team has left the field!

  • dollibug May 9, 2012

    ++++Just how unpopular is President Barack Obama in some parts of the country? Enough that a man in prison in Texas is getting 4 out of 10 votes in West Virginia's Democratic presidential primary.
    DIVERDOWN

    This should tell a lot of people something really important...
    It is time for O to GO....he had a chance to help RESTORE AMERICA....he failed...I think the above statement indicates that people are willing to do whatever it takes for O to go...

  • jjordan231179 May 9, 2012

    Why did some people vote for Santorum or Gingrich? Just to throw away their vote?
    ABO 2012
    May 9, 2012 11:10 a.m.

    Maybe they wanted to vote FOR something instead of being an "ABO" sheep and voting for who their TV or polls says can win. Pretty much you are voting AGAINST something and again will wonder why nothing changes.

  • surfermom May 9, 2012

    ABO - just to send a message to the national organization and to Romney...that he can't move too far to the left

  • working for deadbeats May 9, 2012

    Why did some people vote for Santorum or Gingrich? Just to throw away their vote?

  • DIVERDOWN May 9, 2012

    Just how unpopular is President Barack Obama in some parts of the country? Enough that a man in prison in Texas is getting 4 out of 10 votes in West Virginia's Democratic presidential primary.