World News

82nd Airborne arrives to help aid efforts in Haiti

Posted January 15, 2010

— More than 100 soldiers with 82nd Airborne were awaiting orders at Haiti's main airport Friday morning after a 3-hour flight from Pope Air Force Base turned into a 10-hour journey.

WRAL's Bryan Mims reported that the 82nd's plane circled Port-au-Prince's airport for several hours, but was eventually diverted to Puerto Rico after running low on fuel. A one-hour flight got them into Haiti around 10 p.m. Thursday. The soldiers slept on the tarmac overnight.

The one-runway airport was busy with relief and military flights throughout the night, creating the backlog of flights, Mims said. The airport doesn't appear to have too much damage, he said.

Military officials have said that the 82nd Airborne's primary mission will be to distribute supplies donated by charities and foreign governments. They could also help with security at the airport.

A second contingent of about 800 paratroopers planned to fly to Haiti Friday. The 2,200-strong Marine Expeditionary Unit, based at Camp Lejuene, was also set to sail out. By Monday, a total of 8,000 Marines and soldiers will be in the stricken country.

The Marines bring with them trucks, earth-moving equipment and water-purification systems.

The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson and other military ships have arrived in the Port-au-Prince harbor. Helicopters have been ferrying water and other relief supplies off the Vinson into the airport.

Mims: 82nd finally arrives in Haiti

Meanwhile, the United Nations and other aid organizations struggled Friday to get food and water to stricken millions. Fears of unrest spread as some small bands of young men and boys with machetes roamed the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince.

"They are scavenging everything. What can you do?" said Michel Legros, 53, as he waited for help to search for seven relatives buried in his collapsed house. A Russian search-and-rescue team said the looting and general insecurity were forcing them to suspend their efforts after nightfall.

"The situation in the city is very difficult and tense," said team chief Salavat Mingaliyev, according to Russia's Interfax news agency.

Hundreds of government workers, meanwhile, were burying thousands of bodies in mass graves. The Red Cross estimates 45,000 to 50,000 people were killed in Tuesday's cataclysmic earthquake.

More and more, the focus fell on the daunting challenge of getting aid to survivors. U.N. peacekeepers patrolling the capital said people's anger was rising that aid hasn't been distributed quickly and warned aid convoys to add security to guard against looting.

On Friday morning, no sign was seen of foreign assistance entering the downtown area, other than a U.S. Navy helicopter flying overhead.

Ordinary Haitians sensed the potential for lawlessness. "We're worried that people will get a little uneasy," said attendant Jean Reynol, 37, explaining his gas station was ready to close immediately if violence breaks out.

"People who have not been eating or drinking for almost 50 hours and are already in a very poor situation," U.N. humanitarian spokeswoman Elisabeth Byrs said in Geneva. "If they see a truck with something or if they see a supermarket which has collapsed, they just rush to get something to eat."

The quake's destruction of Port-au-Prince's main prison complicated the security situation. International Red Cross spokesman Marcal Izard said some 4,000 prisoners had escaped and were freely roaming the streets.

"They obviously took advantage of this disaster," Izard said.

But Byrs said peacekeepers were maintaining security despite the challenges. "It's tense but they can cope," she said.

The U.N. World Food Program said post-quake looting of its food supplies long stored in Port-au-Prince appears to have been limited, contrary to an earlier report Friday. It said it would start handing out 6,000 tons of food aid recovered from a damaged warehouse in the city's Cite Soleil slum.

A spokeswoman for the Rome-based agency, Emilia Casella, said the WFP was preparing shipments of enough ready-to-eat meals to feed 2 million Haitians for a month. She noted that regular food stores in the city had been emptied by looters.

The command said other paratroopers and Marines would raise the U.S. presence to 8,000 troops in the coming days. Their efforts will include providing security, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said.

Helicopters have been ferrying water and other relief supplies off the Vinson into the airport, U.S. military officials said. In the heart of Port-au-Prince, the need was clear.

In a tent city with thousands of displaced people, nurse Marimartha Syrel said she had been there since Tuesday night with no water. "We can't cook food. We can't do anything," she said.

At a window of a water treatment facility, Mary Verna was selling the last few bottles of treated water. The plant won't produce more until electricity is restored to the blacked-out city, she said.

"It's desperate, because the water system in Port au Prince beforehand was not very good," said Paul Sherlock, Oxfam's senior humanitarian representative. "When an earthquake happens, any system - no matter how good - is going to have problems: pipes are broken and damaged. We don't know how bad that situation is right now."

Oxfam already had supplies of water in Haiti, left over from a 2008 storm, and has managed to get some 2,000-5,000-liter tanks into Port au Prince, Sherlock said.

Hundreds of bodies were stacked outside the city morgue, and limbs of the dead protruded from the rubble of crushed schools and homes. A few workers were able to free people who had been trapped under the rubble for days.

French firefighters on Thursday pulled three people alive from the ruins of the Montana Hotel after being trapped for more than 50 hours. They were senior staff members of the Maryland-based aid organization IMA World Health, identified by the organization's Douglas Bright as IMA's president, Richard Santos, a vice president, Sarla Chand, and the group's Haiti program manager, Ann Varghese.

They had just finished a meeting at the hotel when the quake struck. But five Haitian employees of the organization were still missing, Bright said.

Driving a yellow backhoe through downtown Friday morning, Norde Pierre Rico said his government crew had cleared one house and found four people alive. But "there's no plan, no dispatch plan," he said, another sign of a lack of coordination and leadership in the rescue and aid efforts in these early days of the crisis.

Experts say people trapped by Tuesday's quake would begin to succumb if they go without water for three or four days.

Haitian President Rene Preval told The Miami Herald that over a 20-hour period, government crews had removed 7,000 corpses from the streets and morgues and buried them in mass graves.

For the long-suffering people of Haiti, the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation, shock was giving way to despair.

"We need food. The people are suffering. My neighbors and friends are suffering," said Sylvain Angerlotte, 22. "We don't have money. We don't have nothing to eat. We need pure water."

From Europe, Asia and the Americas, more than 20 governments, the U.N. and private aid groups were sending planeloads of high-energy biscuits and other food, tons of water, tents, blankets, water-purification gear, heavy equipment for removing debris, helicopters and other transport. Hundreds of search-and-rescue, medical and other specialists also headed to Haiti.

The WFP began organizing distribution centers for food and water Thursday, said Kim Bolduc, acting chief of the large U.N. mission in Haiti. She said that "the risk of having social unrest very soon" made it important to move quickly.

Governments and government agencies have pledged about $400 million worth of aid, including $100 million from the United States.

But the global helping hand was slowed by a damaged seaport and an airport that turned away civilian aid planes for eight hours Thursday because of a lack of space and fuel.

At Toussaint L'Ouverture International Airport, a stream of U.S. military cargo planes was landing Friday, but they had to circle for an hour before getting clearance to land because the quake destroyed the control tower and radar control, and the U.S. military was using emergency procedures.

Aid workers have been blocked by debris on inadequate roads and by survivors gathered in the open out of fear of aftershocks from the 7.0-magnitude quake and re-entering unstable buildings.

"The physical destruction is so great that physically getting from point A to B with the supplies is not an easy task," Casella, the WFP spokeswoman in Geneva, said at a news conference.

Across the sprawling, hilly city, people milled about in open areas, hopeful for help, sometimes setting up camps amid piles of salvaged goods, including food scavenged from the rubble.

Small groups could be seen burying dead by roadsides. Other dust-covered bodies were dragged down streets, toward hospitals where relatives hoped to leave them. Countless dead remained unburied. Outside one pharmacy, the body of a woman was covered by a sheet, a small bundle atop her, a tiny foot poking from its covering.

Aid worker Fevil Dubien said some people were almost fighting over the water he distributed from a truck in a northern Port-au-Prince neighborhood.

Elsewhere, about 50 Haitians yearning for food and water rushed toward two employees wearing "Food For The Poor" T-shirts as they entered the international agency's damaged building.

"We heard a commotion at the door, knocking at it, trying to get in," said project manager Liony Batista. "'What's going on? Are you giving us some food?' We said, 'Uh-oh.' You never know when people are going over the edge."

Batista said he and others tried to calm the crowd, which eventually dispersed after being told food hadn't yet arrived.

"We're not trying to run away from what we do," Batista said, adding that coordinating aid has been a challenge. "People looked desperate, people looked hungry, people looked lost."

21 Comments

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  • phoebelouise Jan 15, 2010

    yeah.....how did the media beat the 82nd there?!

  • merrywidow Jan 15, 2010

    My sweetie's been at work at the Pentagon practically non-stop since 0400 Wed. morning coordinating the Army's response to this tragedy. We're going down there because we are decent human beings, doggone it, and I am proud that our men and women in uniform are helping with such an event!!

  • kbo80 Jan 15, 2010

    I want to know why local news stations feel like they need to be in Haiti? Coverage from CBS, ABC, NBC, FOX, CNN, etc is more than enough. Is Bryan Mims really needed in Haiti? If you are not going to help then you are just in the way.

  • Jeremiah Jan 15, 2010

    "wonder if the taliban and al-qaida are sending their relief and rescue teams to help in this global effort....."

    i'm not even sure the point you're trying to make. that al queda is bad?

  • phoebelouise Jan 15, 2010

    wonder if the taliban and al-qaida are sending their relief and rescue teams to help in this global effort.....

  • Dolphan Jan 15, 2010

    Wish we would have responded this quickly when N.O. was 20 feet under water.

  • John Sawtooth Jan 15, 2010

    The hardst part of any operation is moving thousands of tons of bulky supplies and equipment. To do that you cannot use aircraft all funneled into one shattered airport. Part of the problem is getting aircraft unloaded, and those loads sent out to be distributed to the victims.

    To move the amounts needed requires SHIPS. Which are slower than planes. I am sorry it's taking USNS COMFORT so long to arrive (12 Surgical Rooms, 965 Hospital staff, 1000 Patient beds, Makes 300,000 gallons of fresh water per day).

    The USS CARL VINSON is already there (can host 40+ helicopters as was done in 1994 Haitian relief, makes 400,000 gallons of fresh water per day, 5000 crew to help). When USS BATAAN, USS CARTER HALL and USS FORT MC HENRY arrive, the ability to move cargo will be about 4x-5x what it is now.

    Quantity, speed or quality - pick two. ;-)

  • snshine62d Jan 15, 2010

    Seankelly15 wrote: NCcarguy - This is another nation. Our troops and military aircraft must be invited in or it becomes an invasion. I am sure that the US military has been working as hard as they can to mobilize but things don't happen overnight. If Obama was standing next to a Haitian with a bottle of water, food and a place to stay at the time of the earthquake, folks like you would still complain. It is Just another chance to bash Obama by you and your ilk.

    I agree 100%. Some people just like to hear themselves complain and never give credit when it is due.

  • hollylama Jan 15, 2010

    "And yes, you can excuse the behaviour [looting] under the circumstance, but it doesn't make it right." Yeah it makes it surviving

  • seankelly15 Jan 15, 2010

    NCcarguy - This is another nation. Our troops and military aircraft must be invited in or it becomes an invasion. I am sure that the US military has been working as hard as they can to mobilize but things don't happen overnight. If Obama was standing next to a Haitian with a bottle of water, food and a place to stay at the time of the earthquake, folks like you would still complain. It is Just another chance to bash Obama by you and your ilk.

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