Haiti

Powerful aftershock hits Haiti; Civilian doctors arrive

Posted January 20, 2010
Updated January 21, 2010

— A powerful aftershock sent Haitians screaming into the streets on Wednesday, collapsing buildings, cracking roads and adding to the trauma of a nation stunned by an apocalyptic quake eight days ago. The magnitude-5.9 jolt matched the strongest of the aftershocks that have followed the huge quake of Jan. 12 that devastated Haiti's capital.

The new temblor collapsed seven buildings in Petit-Goave, the seaside town closest to the epicenter, according to Mike Morton of the U.N. Disaster Assessment and Coordination agency, but there were no reports of people crushed or trapped, perhaps because the earlier quake frightened most people into sleeping outside.

"The whole earth below us just moved," WRAL's Bryan Mims said.

WRAL's Bryan Mims in Haiti Bryan Mims: 'The whole ground was shaking'

Mims said the 82nd Airborne rushed out shelters and into a nearby parking lot.

"We stood in the parking lot until things calmed down," Mims said. "The safest place is to be in a wide open area."

Wails of terror erupted in Port-au-Prince, where the aftershock briefly interrupted rescue efforts amid the broken concrete of collapsed buildings, and prompted doctors and patients to flee the University Hospital.

Hundreds of thousands of Haitians remain homeless, hungry and in mourning – most still waiting for the benefits of a nearly $1 billion global aid campaign that has brought hundreds of doctors and thousands of troops to the impoverished Caribbean nation.

U.N. humanitarian chief John Holmes told reporters in New York that 2 million Haitians will probably need food aid for six months, while the World Food Program and other donors so far have reached only about half a million "with reasonable quantities of food" so far.

The U.S. Navy's floating hospital, USNS Comfort, dropped anchor in view of the capital on Wednesday with about 550 medical staff, joining teams from about 30 other countries trying to treat the injured. About 250,000 people were hurt in the quake and aid groups say many people have died for lack of medical care or adequate equipment.

And the Pentagon announced that 2,000 more U.S. Marines would be sent to Haiti, adding 11,500 U.S. military personnel already on the ground or on ships offshore - a number expected to reach 16,000 by week's end.

At a golf course where U.S. troops have been trying to help 25,000 people living under sheets of plastic and old cloth, soldiers and quake victims alike raced for open ground as the quake began.

A slow vibration intensified into side-to-side shaking that lasted about eight seconds. Some in Port-au-Prince said the far stronger Jan. 12 quake seemed to last for 30 seconds.

"It kind of felt like standing on a board on top of a ball," said Staff Sgt. Steven Payne. The 27-year-old from Jolo, West Virginia, who was part of the U.S. Army's aid mission.

At least one woman died of a heart attack, according to Eddy Thomas, a private undertaker who was wheeling her body along a street in Port-au-Prince: "She had a heart condition, and the new quake finished her."

The U.S. Geological Survey said the aftershock was centered about 35 miles (60 kilometers) west-southwest of Port-au-Prince and 6.2 miles (10 kilometers) below the surface.

It was a little further from the capital than last week's magnitude-7.0 quake, which the killed an estimated 200,000 people and made as many as 2 million homeless, according to the European Union.

Wednesday's temblor matched the strongest of 49 aftershocks of magnitude-4.5 or greater that have followed the Jan. 12 quake and USGS geophysicist Bruce Pressgrave said nobody knows if a still-stronger aftershock is possible.

"Aftershocks sometimes die out very quickly," he said. "In other cases they can go on for weeks, or if we're really unlucky it could go on for months" as the earth adjusts to the new stresses caused by the initial quake.

The shaking ripped 8-inch (20-centimeter) cracks in a road west of the capital near Leogane, where U.S. Marines were setting up a post to aid quake victims who are sleeping in streets, culverts and driveways, often under tree branches draped with sheets to guard against the sun

Civilian doctors arrive; set up camp

About 70 personnel from the Disaster Medical Assistance Team set up camp with the 82nd Airborne on Wednesday.

The group is made up of civilian doctors and nurses from San Francisco and New Jersey.

"We will do minor injuries - splinting, lacerations, dehydration," nurse Annie Buftin said.

mims civilian docs Video: Civilian doctors set up camp in Haiti

Buftin said they are expecting to deal with some patients that have infections from wounds that have gone untreated since the quake a week ago.

82nd Airborne's relief running smoothly

Soldiers with the 82nd Airborne Division said relief efforts saw a huge improvement on Wednesday. They were able to setup two lines for citizens hoping to receive food and water.

The orderly process helped burn through the group's supply of meals.

“We’ve blown through all of our supplies here pretty quickly this morning versus normally it takes us a good chunk of the day,” Capt. Jonathan Hartsock said.

82nd Airborne relief efforts going smoothly Video: 82nd Airborne relief efforts going smoothly

The group were handing out meals that would last families for a week instead of just a day.

People continue to be pulled from the rubble

The latest quake, combined with a light rain on Tuesday, has complicated rescue efforts, said Dr. Yi Ting Tsai, part of a Taiwanese crew digging for survivors near the ruined cathedral.

"The problem is the rain and the new quake this morning has made the debris more compact," he said.

International aid teams have saved 121 people from the rubble, an unprecedented number, according to aid organization. Dr. Jon Kim Andrus, deputy director for the Pan American Health Organization, said that "countless more have been rescued by Haitians working with no equipment at all," he said.

A 69-year-old domestic worker, Ena Zizi, said she prayed constantly during her week under the rubble.

She had been at a meeting at the residence of Haiti's Roman Catholic archbishop when the Jan. 12 quake struck, trapping her in debris. On Tuesday, a Mexican disaster team pulled her to safety.

Zizi said after the quake, she spoke back and forth with a vicar who also was trapped. But he fell silent after a few days, and she spent the rest of the time praying and waiting.

"I talked only to my boss, God," she said. "I didn't need any more humans."

Doctors who examined Zizi on Tuesday said she was dehydrated and had a dislocated hip and a broken leg.

Elsewhere in the capital, two women were pulled from a destroyed university building. And near midnight Tuesday, a smiling and singing 26-year-old Lozama Hotteline was carried to safety from a collapsed store in the Petionville neighborhood by the French aid group Rescuers Without Borders.

Aid still being turned away from the airport

Yet the colossal efforts to help Haiti were proving inadequate because of the scale of the disaster. Expectations exceeded what money, will and military might have been able to achieve.

Governments have pledged nearly $1 billion in aid, and thousands of tons of food and medical supplies have been shipped. But much remains trapped in warehouses, or diverted to the neighboring Dominican Republic. Port-au-Prince's nonfunctioning seaport and many impassable roads complicate efforts to get aid to the people.

Aid is still being turned back from the single-runway airport, where the U.S. military has been criticized by some of poorly prioritizing flights. The U.S. Air Force said it had raised the facility's daily capacity from 30 flights before the quake to 180.

U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said the military will send a port-clearing ship with cranes aboard to Port-au-Prince to remove debris that is preventing many larger aid ships from docking.

The U.N. was sending in reinforcements as well: The Security Council voted Tuesday to add 2,000 peacekeepers to the 7,000 already in Haiti, and 1,500 more police to the 2,100-strong international force.

Perhaps as important for many Haitians was the reopening of several money exchange houses on Wednesday and Haitian banks' announcement that they will reopen in rural provinces on Thursday, then in the capital on Saturday. That will help restore the flow of money from Haitians abroad, who send home $1.9 billion a year.

And they may have something to spend the money on: Farmers are again trudging into the capital from hillside plots balancing packages of cauliflower, sweet potato, sugar cane and lettuce on their heads.

9 Comments

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  • PanthersFan45 Jan 20, 5:44 p.m.

    With all the earthquakes and Tsunami's in the pacific over the last several years, it seems like there's a shift to the atlantic now. Those are some pretty strong quakes and aftershocks hitting Haiti. I think the 82nd's presence is a real plus for Haiti and I can't think of a better group of americans to restore order and help those in need.

  • 2headstrong Jan 20, 5:06 p.m.

    I'd be digging through the rubble of my home and pulling out canned goods if I had to. Whose responsibility is it to feed my family regardless of circumstance? Mine.

  • bluepenguin5oh Jan 20, 4:38 p.m.

    chfdcpt... no disrespect but ..WHO CARES?? Not the desperate MILLIONS who at this very moment are dying of thirst , hunger , from their injuries or are trapped (barely alive) in what used to be their home.....the past/history and politics ect , ect ...Does NOT matter right now!!
    As I said below . If you can help ...Please do!! Thank-you

  • chfdcpt Jan 20, 3:45 p.m.

    And how much money has been given to Haiti over the last 25 years since Baby Doc cleaned out the treasury? Did he take that as well?

    Not him, it has been under the control of the UN. However, before the UN took over, we supported the coup that Colonel Raul Cedras from 1991-1994. He left the country prior to the US invading Haiti, and that is where the other money went to.

  • bluepenguin5oh Jan 20, 3:33 p.m.

    These people , fellow humans , are in the most DESPERATE of situations ....please IF you can help financially ($$) call 1-800-RED-CROSS OR you can just text "HAITI" to 90999 ... contact the news station I am sure they can put you in touch with an authorized place that mabey you can "Donate" items or just a little bit of your time to help these terrified , desperate & injured people...PLEASE !!

  • 5-113 FA Retired Jan 20, 3:07 p.m.

    The saddest part of donating anything for humanitarian relief, especially cash, are the endless skimmers and scammers applying their so-called "administrative" fees.

  • Deman Jan 20, 2:52 p.m.

    "I feel the same way about that. Then I remember, that we supported Papa Doc Duvalier and kept him in power, and his son Baby Doc. That family literately left Haiti with every cent that was in the treasury."

    And how much money has been given to Haiti over the last 25 years since Baby Doc cleaned out the treasury? Did he take that as well?

  • chfdcpt Jan 20, 2:29 p.m.

    I feel the same way about that. Then I remember, that we supported Papa Doc Duvalier and kept him in power, and his son Baby Doc. That family literately left Haiti with every cent that was in the treasury.

  • Timetogo Jan 20, 1:00 p.m.

    Don't get me wrong. My heart breaks for these people and I am contributing to try and help... but I did this from my heart and conscience. My question: What's up with this "...I don't know whose responsibility it is, but they need to give us something soon..." Where does it say that it's anyone's responsibility to give anyone anything. We have a huge amount of people out of jobs. Our government is a mess.. Our debt is growing daily.. Is it still our "job" or "responsibility" to aid other countries when nature takes over? I always thought it was our humanitarianism. Not our responsibility.