Local News

Garland named executive director of NC Education Lottery

Posted January 18, 2011

— The North Carolina Education Lottery Commission on Tuesday named Alice Garland its new executive director.

Garland was among the first staff hired at the Education Lottery and has served as deputy executive director for legislative and corporate communications since March 2006 when the lottery began operations.

Garland previously served in executive posts handling governmental affairs and communications, including positions as assistant secretary for communications and external affairs with the North Carolina Department of Commerce; state director of the U.S. Senate office of former U.S. Sen. John Edwards; and director of public affairs for ElectriCities of North Carolina.

The commission unanimously voted for Garland, after a national search that included 55 applications and extensive review of the backgrounds checks of four finalists, commission Chairman Robert Farris said.

“Alice has shown as acting executive director over the past several months the leadership style which we expect will continue to provide maximum returns for the school children of North Carolina through an honest, fiscally sound operation,” Farris said in a statement. “It became apparent to each of the commissioners in interviewing the other candidates that Alice Garland stood out as our top choice.”

Garland, a native of Greeneville, Tenn., has lived in Raleigh for more than 40 years. She received a bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary with a major in urban studies and a minor in economics and received a master’s degree in city and regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

6 Comments

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  • davidbh61255 Jan 20, 9:25 a.m.

    A longtime state bureaucrat!! I wanted to be considered- just sayin

  • LovemyPirates Jan 19, 3:23 p.m.

    When the lottery was passed in what many consider to be an underhanded way, the vast majority of the citizens on NC were in favor of it. Those who were against it predicted what came to be: the majority of those who play the lottery are the least able to spend their money on such; the lottery funds would replace existing public school funds not supplement them and after a few years no one would be happy. Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it.

  • SaveEnergyMan Jan 19, 2:38 p.m.

    The lottery was never a panacea for the schools. It was meant to fund pre-K programs, some college scholarships, and school construction. The poorest counties get large payouts, while Wake County gets very little ($7-8 million last year, I believe). This data is public info and easily gotten to off their home page - see "Where the Money Goes".

    Although I completely agree that the lottery is a tax on those bad at math, the lottery's motives are clear. Whether or not the politicians represented it that way, is another story.

  • demo7691 Jan 19, 1:40 p.m.

    Yeah she comes from a long line of corrupt bosses it loos like.

  • Mark G Jan 19, 11:48 a.m.

    “Alice has shown as acting executive director over the past several months the leadership style which we expect will continue to provide maximum returns for the school children of North Carolina through an honest, fiscally sound operation,” Farris said in a statement.

    Please allow me to translate: "Alice has already demonstrated that she does not mind deceiving the people of North Carolina by telling them this money is 'for the children' and by encouraging those less fortunate to buy into the pie-in-the-sky dream that they could get rich."

    Remember how we were all told how this lottery would solve the budget woes for education. Well, where is that money you thieves? And don't give me the lie that, "it would be worse if we didn't have the lottery." That's bunk. With or without it, the state will spend every dime they can take from us and then a lot more. It's awfully easy to spend someone else's money, especially when you have the power to just take what you want.

  • LL4U Jan 19, 10:06 a.m.

    And her big fat salary is, . . .