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Fewer schools meet student progress standards

Posted July 21, 2010

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— The number of schools in area districts that met student achievement standards under the federal No Child Left Behind law dropped in 2009-10 from the previous school year, according to preliminary results released Wednesday.

The Adequate Yearly Progress, or AYP, standard requires schools to meet attendance targets and reading, math and language arts proficiency targets for various groups of students, including minorities, students with disabilities, students with limited English proficiency and students eligible for free or reduced-price lunches.

Schools must meet all of their individual targets to get credit for making adequate progress overall. The results could impact Title I funding and provide families with the opportunity to change schools if their assigned school has missed AYP more than once.

This year, 61 of Wake County's 158 schools made AYP, down from 98 a year ago. District officials said 54 other schools missed AYP by one or two targets.

Durham Public Schools had 13 of 52 schools make AYP for the 2009-10 school year, compared with 22 the previous year. In Johnston County, the number of schools making AYP this year dropped from 34 to 24 of 40.

Thirteen of 19 schools in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district made AYP, compared with 15 a year ago. In other Orange County schools, five of 12 made AYP, while 11 met the standard a year ago.

In Cumberland County, 50 of 87 schools made AYP, down from 62 in 2008-09. Twenty of 31 schools in Wayne County met the annual standard, compared with 28 a year ago.

The state sent advisers to Halifax County Schools last year to help low-performing schools, but the preliminary results show only one of 11 schools in the district met AYP in 2009-10.

State officials said it's difficult to put the numbers into meaningful context until the state's detailed report comes out in early August.

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  • Plenty Coups Jul 22, 2010

    msudawg-"Plenty Coups "Same tired old argument. Half of all Charter schools fail miserably while the other half do fine. A 50% success rate."

    I am not sure where you come up with the 50% figure if you look at the results 74 of 96 charter schools made AYP that is 78%. A lot better than the WCPSS with 61 of 158 schools making AYP or 38%"

    AYP is essentially meaningless. It doesn't represent the school's test scores or tell you whether or not a school fails. All it does is record whether or not every student in 24 subgroups met adequate yearly progress. (Ex. limited english speakers, african americans, caucasians, students with emotional disorders, etc.)Charter schools do not have the same diversity as public schools, they tend to have populations basically all of one race. Hence, less subgroups. As far as my comment on charter schools, the News and Observer has continuosly documented this. Read one article (of many):
    http://www.wral.com/news/state/story/1475274/

  • blove1026 Jul 21, 2010

    If so many schools, across the state, are seeing a drastic decrease in scores, could something have changed with the testing?

  • VT1994Hokie Jul 21, 2010

    The reason is that they don't KNOW HOW to teach children to read. They, like too many bring in all of these programs.....over and over. California is leading the pack with all of these new Staff Development activities. "OUR program is the best." Then they say...."just look at the test scores." BULL. I have seen this stuff for over 30+ years in education.

    Teach them how to read first. Spend money where is makes the most difference. Anyone with a decent education knows that if they can't comprehend reading then they can't do math, science, nor any other subject matter. Test scores are about knowing how to READ!!!

  • UPTOP Jul 21, 2010

    It's sad, because of the budget our kids are the ones that are suffering the most !!The cut backs on Teachers, programs, pay etc. is sad, where as other areas are getting bailouts !! where's the bailout for our kids education ???

  • msudawg Jul 21, 2010

    Plenty Coups "Same tired old argument. Half of all Charter schools fail miserably while the other half do fine. A 50% success rate."

    I am not sure where you come up with the 50% figure if you look at the results 74 of 96 charter schools made AYP that is 78%. A lot better than the WCPSS with 61 of 158 schools making AYP or 38%

  • oceanchild71 Jul 21, 2010

    Any group of 40+ students equals one subgroup. So, assuming a school has 550 white students, 400 black students, 200 Hispanic Students, 60 Asian students, and 5 Native Americans, that would be 4 subgroups there. There are not enough Native Americans to constitute a subgroup. There are Limited English Proficiency, Economically Disadvantaged, Non-Economically Disadvantaged, Students With Disabilities, etc subgroups in each school as long as there are 40 students within each group. Then, each student has a predetermined level they must reach in order to meet AYP. If enough students within a subgroup do not reach that level, the subgroup fails, and IF ONE SUBGROUP FAILS THE WHOLE SCHOOL FAILS!!!

    And BTW, 8% increase in pay for teachers per year? HA! We've not had cost-of-living adjustments or step raises the past 2 years. And not too long ago we went through the same thing!!! Teachers always get the hit first and it is doubled - no pay and less books, supplies, etc and support.

  • Plenty Coups Jul 21, 2010

    colliedave-"This year, 61 of Wake County's 158 schools made AYP, down from 98 a year ago.

    If this were a test, it would give that student a solid "F." This score is past pathetic."

    AYP means each and every child, n every different subgroup passed. By these standards, you could take any business in America and holding it to the same standards, declare it a failure if any of its workers didn't perform up to standards in each different subgroup. (EX. Limited English speakers, African-Americans, caucasians, disabled etc.) In other words, this doesn't mean much.

  • Plenty Coups Jul 21, 2010

    "Hence the need for vouchers. Let's assume the county budgets 10K per child. Offer the parents a 5K voucher to send their child to a private school of their choice. The County can then spend the other 5K elsewhere in the system. Should be a win-win for both parties."

    Its not a win win situation except for people who want to send their children to a private religious school. Thats about the cost. ($5000) If you want to send your child to a secular private scool, the costs more than double. The losers would be the taxpayers, who would now have to pay for people to send their kids to a religious school, free from any public oversight, testing, teacher certification, and standards. The only ones realistically who could do that would be the wealthy.

  • dhsjr88 Jul 21, 2010

    and yes NCAE is NOT a union. Also, their fees are really expensive. If they could actually do something for me like other state's unions, then I would join. Till then, NCAE doesn't help.

  • Plenty Coups Jul 21, 2010

    whatelseisnew-"Quit and push for more charter schools and vouchers for private schools."

    Same tired old argument. Half of all Charter schools fail miserably while the other half do fine. A 50% success rate.

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