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Student in Krzyzewskiville contracts meningitis

Posted February 11, 2009
Updated March 9, 2009

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— A Duke University freshman was diagnosed Tuesday with meningicoccal meningitis and was being treated at Duke University Hospital, officials said.

The unidentified female student had been camped out in Krzyzewskiville, the location near Cameron Indoor Stadium where students wait for basketball game tickets, to get tickets to Wednesday night's game against the University of North Carolina.

Krzyzewskiville Duke student contracts meningitis

As a precaution, officials started antibiotic treatments for the student, her roommates and the students who had been camping with her.

The university's student affairs office said 10 to 15 students were being treated.

Bacterial meningitis cannot be transmitted through casual contact, Duke officials said, and they added that the risk of the disease spreading on campus was small.

Still, they said they were following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines to prevent any outbreak.

23 Comments

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  • See Chart Feb 12, 4:47 p.m.

    It should be mandatory for every High school and college
    student to receive this vaccine .
    Nick Spring a special olympic's champion several years
    ago when he was at summer camp contracted this disease
    at 14 years of age,He lost his arms and legs and yet
    manages quite well as a sport's star with prosthesis.
    He has been featured on Television,quite remarkable story.

  • woodrowboyd2 Feb 11, 8:38 p.m.

    this sounds like the docs at maria parham
    thought i might have been in the wrong story

  • oldfirehorse Feb 11, 4:14 p.m.

    I would think that Coach K could encourage the University to provide better accommodations for the students freezing to death in K'ville! This is yet another example of how the hard pressed students take second chair to the wealthy alumni when it comes to tickets! Duke, put up a big tent and put some heat in it so this tragic event doesn't repeat itself!

  • uncfan89 Feb 11, 4:14 p.m.

    Really stinks to have camped out that long and have to watch the game on a little tv in a hospital bed. Hope she is better soon and no one else comes down with it. That said GO HEELS!!

  • BlueDevilFan Feb 11, 4:07 p.m.

    "What is the point of this thread if you can't poke some fun at Duke students? WRAL is obviously biased toward them."

    Making fun of a sick person is really callous. But, trust me...WRAL has NEVER been biased in the favor of Duke!

  • SME2 Feb 11, 3:57 p.m.

    What is the point of this thread if you can't poke some fun at Duke students? WRAL is obviously biased toward them.

  • deduce Feb 11, 3:54 p.m.

    One more thing on the vaccines...until about 20 years ago, the leading cause of bacterial meningitis was a bacteria called Haemophilus influenzae, but this has been nearly eliminated as a cause of new cases due to vaccination.

  • oldfirehorse Feb 11, 3:54 p.m.

    alrighty then! I sure hope the young woman makes a great recovery.

  • deduce Feb 11, 3:45 p.m.

    jmrose2 - the information you are providing regarding vaccines is absolutely incorrect. There are two vaccines that protect against the two leading causes of bacterial meningitis: Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis.

    M0nky - while it is true that a bacterial infection (inc bact. meningitis) is TREATED with antibiotics (as opposed to most viral infections), the most common forms of bacterial meningitis can be PREVENTED with vaccines.

  • SnoopDogg Feb 11, 3:44 p.m.

    To clarify, there is NO vaccine for VIRAL meningitis (the less serious one)
    There IS a vaccine (called Menactra) for BACTERIAL meningitis (the more serious one), which is what this student contracted, according to the article. Meningococcal meningitis is what the vaccine Menactra protects against.

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