Local News

Brad Cooper asks for court-appointed attorney

Posted October 28, 2008

Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— Brad Cooper stood expressionless and said nothing Tuesday afternoon as he faced a judge for the first time since being charged with murder in the July death of wife, Nancy Cooper.

Speaking on his behalf were his attorneys, Howard Kurtz and Seth Blum, who asked Wake County District Judge Jane Gray to appoint their client a public defender, saying he is not in a position to hire his own attorney.

Gray granted the request and ordered Cooper – wearing an orange and white jumpsuit – back to jail, where he is being held without bond.

Both lawyers are among a team of attorneys that represent Cooper in the custody dispute with his wife's family over the Coopers' two young children.

Kurtz will continue to represent him, according to the Office of the Capital Defender, the part of the state's court system that ensures defendants who need it have legal representation.

A Wake County grand jury on Monday indicted Cooper, 35, more than three months after his wife's body was found in an undeveloped subdivision three miles from the Coopers' Cary home. A state medical examiner's autopsy found she had likely been strangled.

Cooper told police Nancy Cooper went jogging around 7 a.m. on July 12 and never returned home. Through his attorneys, he has denied being involved with her slaying, but has admitted to police that he and his wife were having marital difficulties.

Claiming Cooper was emotionally abusive to his wife in the months prior to her death, Nancy Cooper's family filed for and gained granted temporary custody of the children.

That temporary custody is still intact, said Alice Stubbs, an attorney representing Nancy Cooper's family, and a judge is still working out the details of the order.

Back in court, a handful of Nancy Cooper's friends, as well as Brad Cooper's mother, Carol Cooper, attended the first court appearance.

Carol Cooper did not comment as she left the courthouse, but friends said they wanted to be there to represent Nancy Cooper's family in Canada.

"We figured someone needed to be here to represent that side," said friend Hannah Prichard. "We just felt like we wanted to come."

Prichard said now that police have made an arrest, they feel like they can begin the healing process of losing a friend.

"I think everyone is feeling good that we have taken a step in the right direction," she said.

"The tears, they're coming. We laugh, we yell, we cry within minutes of each other, and it's definitely an emotional roller coaster."

101 Comments

This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • its_me_grasshopper Oct 29, 2008

    He didn't look too poor by the house he was staying in! I say sell it and pay up Brad!

  • marina Oct 29, 2008

    Great post, Tiblet! I couldn't have said it better.

  • tiblet Oct 29, 2008

    If you watch the deposition videos...it is clear the Brad is oddly cold and detached. Unable to recall his only nephew's name, does not know his mother's middle or maiden name, could not remember what he did when Nancy called him to tell him that she miscarried for the first time...did he leave work right away? Take her to the Dr...he could not remember.

    I think he is a cold, calculating, manipulative person who realized how much $$ it was going to cost him to divorce his wife and made the deliberate decision to go another way...

  • North Wake Dad Oct 29, 2008

    "Yes, that is a serious comment. He had no history of violence. How many times did he hit his wife? I never heard such a claim made. So, you want me to believe he went from not laying a hand on her to murder? No... I do not buy it."

    Perpetrators of spousal homicide are very often previously unknown to the police. Even if prior violence has occurred in the relationship, a lot of the time nobody knows about it. So not knowing about violence on Brad Cooper's part doesn't amount to much in the way of a defense.

  • Alexia.1 Oct 29, 2008

    Cookie Me Elmo,

    Yes, that is a serious comment. He had no history of violence. How many times did he hit his wife? I never heard such a claim made. So, you want me to believe he went from not laying a hand on her to murder? No... I do not buy it.

  • F650gs Oct 29, 2008

    I read the N&O story in the paper this morning and it does seem to paint an unflattering portrait of BC. I think as a newspaper they should be a bit more objective, but that doesn't sell papers, does it? Anyway, the burden is on the prosecution to prove guilty beyond a reasonable doubt... the defense just needs to provide some doubt. Another poster brought up the OJ trial, which seemed slam dunk. I enjoy Henry Lee's work and had the chance to hear him lecture. I have a book of his and this book has a section about the OJ trial, for which Dr. Lee testified for the defense. Its very interesting because Dr. Lee did not have an interest in guilt or innocence, but just pointed out the inconsistencies in the forensic evidence the prosecution presented. I had to agree, that caused me to have some doubt about guilt too...and that's all a good defense needs. For those interested in forensics, you should check out Lee's works.

  • Historian snuck back in Oct 29, 2008

    "Waiting for WRAL to update this story or create a new one. From the N&O report, it looks pretty damning for this guy. At the very least, he was a pretty crummy human being."

    http://www.newsobserver.com/2864/story/1271510.html

    The N&O story that I read seems pretty close to WRAL's and doesn't imply or suggest that Mr. Cooper as you said, is a "pretty crummy human being" at all.

  • Drakula_I_G Oct 29, 2008

    Waiting for WRAL to update this story or create a new one.
    From the N&O report, it looks pretty damning for this guy.
    At the very least, he was a pretty crummy human being.

  • Common Sense Man Oct 29, 2008

    "There was also a grand jury in the case of Peyton Strickland, who was gunned down by Wilmington Police, they returned a true bill against the officer who killed him, but the procecutor didn't move forward and charge the cop."

    They never indicted the officer.

  • pebbles262004 Oct 29, 2008

    keep looking toward that know it all friend of hers

More...