Local News

NC Wanted investigates gang violence in the Triangle

Posted August 7, 2008

— From a melee at Triangle Town Center to a brawl at Red's Beach Club, street gangs have become a hot topic. To investigate, Fox 50's NC Wanted talked to some people who have intimate knowledge of gang activity across the Triangle.

To protect their identities, the people interviewed for the story were given fake names.

"They just want that respect, like, yeah, you know, don't cross my line 'cause you know I'll off you," gang member Allen said.

"Everybody started out selling drugs, thinking it's cool, trying to get them some old schools with the rims, trying to get the money. That's what it's all about," gang member Mario said.

A recent survey estimated there are 14,500 gang members in North Carolina, and projections put numbers at 29,000 to 41,000 within five years. As to whether the tide can be stemmed in the next five years, the gang members we talked to are doubtful.

"I don't think it's solvable. Cause it's been that way too long. People are used to it. People are not going to start banging because people in power tell them to stop banging," gang member Nicole said.

"I would say a percentage of people that's in gangs would be about 75 to 80 percent. Two people out of every 10 dudes, not even that much, would stand up and say 'I ain't in no gang,'" Mario said.

"They ain't any real way you can hide from it. Everybody got somebody that's affiliated. Everybody got somebody in their family that's a gang member, so you affiliated by that," Allen said.

However, at the same time, every person with whom Fox 50 talked with saw a way out of that life of violence.

"I found my way out. My way out was through school. That's the way I see it, it's through school. Yeah, I probably ain't going to lie. If I won't in school, I'd probably be out there with my friends right now either incarcerated, on the block, running from police, driving without a driver's license, stealing somebody's car. I probably wouldn't lie. I probably would, but you know, it's about the love of my mama," Mario said.

"I'm a little scared, but it's exciting because I'm ready to be, be someone successful," Nicole said.

"Bullets don't have no names on them. Fly anywhere and knock somebody out. It's what it is all about in the end. That's why you've got to stay away from it," Allen said.

So what can be done about North Carolina's gang problem? Friday night, you will hear some of what NC Wanted discovered from adults working on the front-lines, in our areas toughest gang neighborhoods.

Then watch “NC Wanted: Growing up Hard” this Saturday night, after the 10 p.m. news on Fox 50.

18 Comments

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  • heldensoul Aug 13, 2008

    stop breeding if you can't afford to be there for your children. unfortunately, our gov'ts pay unemployed and oftentimes uneducated people to reproduce...a baby is not a paycheck. use "condom sense".

  • iamforjustice Aug 8, 2008

    I was talking to my very good friends Southpoint, In & Out, #1NascarFan, HeHeHe, MrsSteel, North_Raleigh_Guy, PWCC and a several others, and we all agree that this started as a city problem and needs to be addressed there ASAP, before it spreads to great towns like Cary. Cary is a fabulous place to live and we don't want it destroyed by the punks that terrorize the cities. Stop it at your borders and fix it.
    SP2SCV

    Too late I am afraid. They are called Folk Nation. Just because Cary has a low hispanic and Black population doesn't mean that gangs don't exist.

  • iamforjustice Aug 8, 2008

    Gang members are criminals. You have to ask what to do with them? Have forums? This is a sick country. All you have to do is gather them up and send them to an Arizona dessert where they have to fiend for their food, cut wood to build their own houses and give them a tv that only plays opera. If they thirsty they can share each other's spit. I have the answers for these gang members. Just give me the questions.

  • greentara Aug 8, 2008

    please! lock up that big fat gang, glaxo smith cline!!!! it had too much bling bling going on old school style.

  • fletchermse Aug 8, 2008

    "You don't really think it's that easy, do you?"

    You aren't really that presumptuous, are you?

    Small-timers, who use primarily marijuana (being the most common) as a fundraiser would have no market. Yes, they could switch to alternative "products", but the competition would be much more difficult and risky against those gangs who already deal in such drugs. Most of the small time gangs and gang members would be easily destroyed by such a simple act.

    It's a step in the right direction. Locking up thugs permanently would go very nicely with this.

  • Dark of the Moon Aug 8, 2008

    I was talking to my very good friends Southpoint, In & Out, #1NascarFan, HeHeHe, MrsSteel, North_Raleigh_Guy, PWCC and a several others, and we all agree that this started as a city problem and needs to be addressed there ASAP, before it spreads to great towns like Cary. Cary is a fabulous place to live and we don't want it destroyed by the punks that terrorize the cities. Stop it at your borders and fix it.

  • carolinakhaki Aug 8, 2008

    "Legalizing marijuana to some extent would crush the vast majority of gangs."

    You don't really think it's that easy, do you?

  • Justin T. Aug 8, 2008

    I don't see anything wrong with WRAL's coverage of this story. I think everybody is really interested in the gang situation after the triangle town center melee. Yes, I said melee.

    Also, the language was cleaned up if anything. Or, if you don't think so, go down to the hood and listen for yourself.

    holla, holla, bling, bling, my taxpayers.

  • fletchermse Aug 8, 2008

    As noted in this article, it starts out with drug sales. Legalizing marijuana to some extent would crush the vast majority of gangs.

  • streetfightinman Aug 8, 2008

    WRAL you should be ashamed of this story and the wording in it
    hooked on ebonics is comical.

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