Local News

Neighborhood not welcoming Highway 98 Bypass extension

Posted April 9, 2008
Updated April 29, 2008

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— The extension of the Highway 98 bypass near Wakefield is causing controversy in Wake County, with residents on two streets saying the road is much too close to their homes.

The road currently ends at US Highway 1. The extension would connect US 1 to Thomson Mill Road and eventually link to Old Highway 98. The proposed 1.5-mile extension is expected to be completed in 2010.

Neighbors are concerned about declining property values and their quality of life.

Lenore and Richard Ziff moved into the Wakefield Plantation neighborhoods 2½ years ago.

The Ziffs said they were notified about a road, but said representatives were “less than forthright” about the kind of road that would be built and how close it would be to the homes. The Ziffs said the builder, Pulte Homes, didn’t offer details.

Sheryle L. Kursar of Pulte Homes said in a statement to WRAL-TV that all homeowners signed a full disclosure agreement.

“Each homeowner signed an addendum to their contracts acknowledging their understanding that the bypass was going to be built,” Kursar said.

Kursar said that when Pulte Homes purchased the home sites in September 2004, the project was already approved. Homeowners were given the contact information for the state Department of Transportation so they could stay updated on the progress of the road. The bypass at that time was public record, she said.

Lenore Ziff said a lot of people “did not expect a major highway.”

“Seems to me the road’s going to be in my back yard pretty much,” Lenore Ziff said of the road that will be the last leg of the 98 bypass.

The Ziffs are concerned about the proximity of the road to their home and the possible noise. Lenore Ziff added that some foliage would be helpful to prevent them from looking at an “ugly wall.”

The noise may be a problem for some residents.

“If you build as a developer or property owner after the date of public record, then we’re not allowed to spend federal state dollars to build a noise buffer,” said Wally Bowman, an engineer with the Department of Transportation.

The DOT bought the right of way more than 12 years ago, before the homes on Basketweave Drive were built.

DOT officials plan to meet with neighbors later this month.

While some residents are putting up for-sale signs, the Ziffs say they’ll try to live with the bypass.

“It’s just sad, because everybody is really unhappy,” Lenore Ziff said.


This story is closed for comments.

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  • ncwebguy Apr 30, 2008

    Is buying a house in a recent subdivision "family heritage"? Wow. And there are plenty of people (local and transplants) who don't want to live in Wake Forest. Having a Super Wal-Mart, 90% of the restaurants are chains, and home owner associations that require green grass is not everyone's idea of a good place to live.

    If people don't like the traffic in Wake Forest, don't live in Wake Forest. If you already lived there, fight to establish zoned density low to keep subdivisions from popping up. If you want some subdivisons (Heritage) and not others (Wakefield), you don't have a leg to stand on. New Wake Forest residents think they got a good deal on a house, but getting around with $4+/gallon gas, and now depressed home prices due to the bypass, make living closer to work (and/or public transportation) look better all the time.

  • Weetie Apr 10, 2008

    Thats the price you pay when you want to live in that area. Quarter million dollar homes on a pinch of land...you all should have known better! LOL.

    Well, I don't live in that area but alot of these people have been there many years. If not them, their families. So what are you supposed to do? Sell or give away your family heritage that has been in your family for hundred of years?

    I found myself in the same situation when I-40 was built. My family had owned the land for many, many years...Hate to tell you but the government don't care. Either you sell it to them or they will take it. Happened to us!

  • Bob Sidel Apr 10, 2008

    Real Deal Tar Heel...sounds like you're the one who's whining. I believe a lot of these yankees are enrolled at UNC as well, no?

  • Why Is My Slim Physique Envied Apr 10, 2008

    Thats the price you pay when you want to live in that area. Quarter million dollar homes on a pinch of land...you all should have known better! LOL

  • john60 Apr 10, 2008

    Feds won't allow their money to be spent on noise walls for homes built after the hearing is held. It's part of the public record and their decision to live next to a freeway once that hearing is held. Plus, real estate agents are required to tell buyers about any roads being built or planned near the property, but a lot of times they tend to minimize or gloss over that little requirement...

  • RaleighMan Apr 10, 2008

    Everyone wants to get there faster, but nobody wants a bypass in their back yard. Everybody wants to plug in their electric car at night, but nobody wants an electric plant in their back yard. Everyone wants their trash hauled off weekly, but nobody wants a landfill in their back yard. Anybody else see a trend here besides me? They should just be glad the DOT didn't want to put a road THROUGH their house b/c they can do that too...and you can't stop them from doing so.

  • Space Mountain Apr 10, 2008

    momto4girls1boy, that light you are talking about is ridiculous. It does back up traffic on 98 headed to Durham and adds 15 more minutes to the drive in the morning. What they should have done when they built 540 is extend it to the Franklin County line so that folks from Wake Forest can completely Capital Blvd to get on 540. Instead, you have to travel down Capital and all those stop lights to get to 540, which completely defeats the purpose of having 540 anyway. It's actually quicker just going down 98 to get to Durham/RTP in the morning than trying to get to 540 because of all the traffic on Capital. But that's the DOT for you. Not very good foresight. It would be great if they made 98 four lanes, too.

  • Space Mountain Apr 10, 2008

    They should have known about the highway before they bought their overpiced house that's two feet from their neighbors just so they can say they live in Wakefield and show off that they have money. Just some more whining by the yankees who come down here and then want to complain about everything once they arrive. I swear things have gotten worse here because of all the yankees that have come down here. Higher prices for homes, overcrowded roads, and overcrowded schools. Do you think they built all these new homes for folks who were born and grew up in the Triangle? Pretty soon it's not going to be called the Tar Heel state, but the Relocated Yankee state. If you don't like it, then move, hopefully back up north. Quit whining when you should have known the highway was coming.

  • momto4girls1boy Apr 9, 2008

    I have lived in WF my entire life...All the changes happen because everyone wants to move here and live. Then the whining begins because changes have to be made to accomodate all ya'll moving here. Go back! or Be Quiet! I can remember being in school and talk about the bypass way back then. It is nothing new, and is needed. I don't know that it will help much with traffic on 98 headed West...that seems to be a Six Forks/New Light Rd intersection issue -yet another story.

  • cocker_mom Apr 9, 2008

    Hey - if the folks that bought houses near the airport can complain about airport noise, these folks can complain about a known bypass.

    I guess it's always the same - everyone wants to be the last one to move here and then shut the doors immediately after they settle - so nothing changes.

    Apparently they are aren't thinking that THEIR moving here likely causes someone else to get a bypass in THEIR backyard a few years earlier (i.e. 540)

    Do your research. With tools like iMaps in Wake County - there is absolutely NO EXCUSE for being uninformed. And the fact that you SIGNED AN ADDENDUM to your purchase contract - perhaps that should have tossed up a red flag that it would probably be close, or else they would not have sought to protect themselves by a legal document?

    Always victims.