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Attorneys Seek State Delay in Lethal Injection Debate

Posted September 26, 2007

Death Row, Death Penalty, Execution
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— Attorneys for death-row inmates asked state officials Wednesday to put off possible changes to North Carolina's execution protocol in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to address the constitutionality of lethal injections.

The high court on Tuesday agreed to hear a challenge from two Kentucky inmates who alleged that the state's lethal injection method of execution amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.

The Council of State, a nine-member board that includes Gov. Mike Easley and other statewide elected officials, is expected to discuss North Carolina's execution protocol next month.

Senior Administrative Law Judge Fred Morrison Jr. ruled last month that officials need to consider input from attorneys representing death-row inmates before adjusting the protocol to ensure condemned inmates don't suffer during executions. His ruling addressed some of the same issues covered in the Kentucky case and in a recent federal court ruling in Tennessee.

"If the Council of State acts on the proposed protocol now, prior to the Supreme Court's ruling in (the Kentucky case), it runs the risk of approving a death penalty procedure that within months or even weeks may be declared unconstitutionally flawed by our highest court," the attorneys wrote in the letter.

North Carolina's use of lethal injection has been tied up in the courts for months after the North Carolina Medical Board adopted a policy that threatened to revoke the medical licenses from physicians who participate in executions.

A judge last week ruled that the medical board had overstepped its authority and couldn't punish physicians for taking part in a state-sanctioned execution.

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  • doubletrouble Sep 27, 2007

    Dang...If our founding fathers only KNEW on how conscrewed our legal system has evolved into. At the time our constitution was written, I believe hanging and firing squads, were the two most perferred methods on dispatching a capital offense to anyone. What they want is their free food, bunks,weights, education, medical, and TV, and oh yea, their life. Did they forget they robbed someone else of their life, happiness,love, family,home? Prison systems today, are a bankroll of business and services. I'm sure law enforcement and guards...get tired of revolving door of justice, just as much as the majority of taypaying citizens. Remember who is actually paying for this type of mayhem...it's U and Me.

  • likemenow Sep 27, 2007

    for the attorneys, delay=more billable hours

  • jrbuddy Sep 27, 2007

    Round and round we go.... ANYTHING to delay delivering justice to the poor suffering convicts, and most of all, justice to the victims.

    MY, MY, Why did we ever do away with public hangings in the town square?

  • All child molesters should die Sep 26, 2007

    The high court on Tuesday agreed to hear a challenge from two Kentucky inmates who alleged that the state's lethal injection method of execution amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. And, ah, the POOR VICTIMS didn't experience cruel and unusual punishment, as they were having the life taken out of them?

    Give me a break!!

  • jotoho99 Sep 26, 2007

    These people have been sentenced to death and they think it cruel, what about the people they Killed or Raped I guess that was not cruel. if they don't want the injection, then give them the fireing squad