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State puts FSU nursing program on probation

Posted August 30, 2007
Updated January 28, 2009

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— The state Board of Nursing on Thursday placed the nursing program at Fayetteville State University on probation, giving the school one year to bring the program into compliance with state standards.

"Their choices were not just to give us a warning. Their choices were to close the program down right away, and they did not," FSU Interim Chancellor Vic Hackley said.

The move comes three months after 24 of 31 FSU senior nursing students failed to graduate because they failed an exam from Health Education Systems Inc. The students threatened to sue, saying the test wasn't part of their graduation requirements, and 13 passed when they were given a chance to retake the exam.

Hackley, who took over after Chancellor T.J. Bryan resigned under pressure last month amid questions about the nursing program and FSU's finances, said the school hadn't been using the exam correctly. It should have been given earlier as an assessment tool, he said.

"(We need to) find out what they need early on, start giving them the content, the lecture support, the tutoring (and) the mentoring program they need to keep them on track," Hackley said.

The nursing board already has ordered FSU to communicate graduation requirements more clearly to students.

Hackley said the nursing program's admission standards were weren't tough enough and said administrators had been in too much of a rush to get the program going. The school has improvement plans in place, he said, adding that the probationary status wouldn't affect students already in the program.

"These recommendations look good on paper, but we want to make sure they come to fruition," he said.


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  • whatusay Sep 1, 2007

    I don't know of too many schools that allow you to graduate without taking a final exam. What did these potential nurses expect...to pay tuition, don't worry about going to classes, don't be concerned with studying, as long as you stay the four years you will be a nurse....I don't think so. To threaten the school with a law suit is as stupid as not being able to pass the final exam.

  • wakeraised Aug 31, 2007

    I personally would love to be a RN however, biology is not a strong subject. Yes, there are schools out there that will let you in without Biology, but it makes me wonder about their credibility as an academic institution. Anyone who knows anything about nursing school knows that you must pass a board certification test upon graduation. I would not let any of those nursing students who threatned to sue anywhere near me when I need care. The students and nursing program need to aim higher! I will value those humble days when I worked as nursing assistant II, and I will expect to take a board certification exam if I complete a nursing program.

  • Codepwned Aug 31, 2007

    There is a mass shortage of nurses, thus the requirements slink down. Of course this is directly associated with the rising cost of healthcare.

  • Aries82 Aug 31, 2007

    I've been in the healthcare field for 30+ years, and I have seen a decline in the quality of nursing. I don't think you need to starch your clothes, wear your little hats, but at least be professionals. Someone depends on their nursing skills to help them heal. The patient is not there for the nurse, the nurse is there for the patient.

  • pleshy Aug 30, 2007

    Come on, does anybody really believe there is quality education at Fayettenam State Univ?

  • MizzZeta Aug 30, 2007

    There's probably some truth to that, psychobabble. I can remember receiving acceptance letters to some colleges/universities my senior year in high school, without having ever completed an application to those schools!

  • anonemoose Aug 30, 2007

    That's like other lower class colleges. It's not your likelihood to succeed or your academic record that gets you in, but the ability to pay the tuition that is the most important consideration.