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Pharmacy Employee Charged With Stealing, Selling Drugs

Posted April 20, 2007

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— An employee at a local pharmacy has been charged with stealing thousands of prescription pills and selling them, authorities said.

Morgan Brooke Jones, 21, of 5900 Terri Wood Drive, was arrested on April 3 after an undercover officer bought Alprazolam, a generic form of Xanax, on the street, authorities said. About 9,700 Alprazolam pills were seized after Jones' arrest, and investigators determined the pills were stolen from Almand’s Drug Store at Westridge Shopping Center, where Jones was employed as a pharmaceutical technician.

Jones was charged with two counts each of possession with the intent to sell and deliver Schedule IV controlled substance and maintaining a vehicle for the purpose of keeping and storing a controlled substance and one count of selling and delivering a Schedule IV controlled substance.

After the arrest, the Nash County Sheriff’s Office called in the State Bureau of Investigation and the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy to assist in the case.

Jones was rearrested Thursday and charged with 12 counts of embezzlement of a controlled substance by employee stemming from the theft of 24,000 Alprazolam pills over the last year, authorities said.


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  • At Work Apr 25, 2007

    I have worked in drug stores in the past for years and when inventory is done there have been some stores where tons of pills have been missing and that I know of nothing much was done. At one store in particular the head pharmacy was a alcoholic and what ever else yet he hept his job, why dont ask me, but when inventory was done wow at the med's missing. Point no one lost there job. Funny how the world works!!

  • chelles1 Apr 24, 2007

    First of all some of the information that is being told in this story is not accurate. Sounds like to me it doesnt take a real rocket scientist to figure out that ,there is no way possible that this person could have removed that many alone,lets use a little common sense here. So you as the public put two and two together & see what you come up with? No shes not perfect & everyone makes mistakes,& sometimes you have to learn from your mistakes,but lets give credit where credit is due ,I think they need to look into the situation,and find who else needs to have the finger pointed at! Thanks

  • strolling bones Apr 22, 2007

    Who knew it could be that easy? Them are a lot of pills. She musta had a huge purse. How could this not be missed on inventory? Surely they have a simple program that tallies the daily drug total, if not I will be changing professions shortly.

  • superman Apr 22, 2007

    I am sorry-- but 27,000 pills missing-- is not a few today and a few tomorrow.

  • NCTeacher Apr 21, 2007

    I understand that, I used to work at a local pharmacy. What I am saying is she probably didn't swipe 24,000 pills all at one time. She probably swiped a few here and a few there. And I am sure someone knew to begin with that pills were slowly going missing. But she probably wasn't the only person who worked there and the boss had to have time to find out who was doing it.

  • 2 Apr 21, 2007

    if someone knew pills were missing you find out that moment... its a very big deal if you have these type of pills missing.

  • NCTeacher Apr 21, 2007

    I am sure someone at the pharmacy realized that pills were going missing, but it took some time to figure out who was causing it.

  • 2 Apr 21, 2007

    No wonder meds cost so much now... wonder how many pharmacy's have these same issues currently going on.

  • superman Apr 20, 2007

    How could he cover up or explain 24,000 pills missing? Purchases, minus sales should equal inventory? I guess he told his boss he miscounted when he was filling prescriptions.

  • billengr99 Apr 20, 2007

    And no one at the pharmacy realized 24,000 pills were missing? Sounds like there is a bigger problem that needs to be fixed.