Local News

Holdouts From Hurricane Floyd Wonder If They Made The Right Decision

Posted September 14, 2000

— Thirty miles separate Wilson and Goldsboro, but people in both cities are facing similar problems. One year ago, Hurricane Floyd destroyed homes as well as the neighborhoods.

The water is all gone, but Irene Rogers' neighbors are too. Her home of 48 years had just minor damage, but dozens of her friends were flooded out. She says the neighborhood is nothing like the place where she raised her family.

"The neighborhood is going down. They're going to leave everything the way it is," she says. "They don't come down and mow the grass."

Derrick Goff remembers the day Stoney Creek came right into his home on Mulberry Street in Goldsboro. Twelve of his neighbors gave up and moved out, but he fixed up and stayed at least for now.

"I'm not too fond of living by this creek any more," he says. "The next place we do reside, it's going to be away from water."

During the flood, many people just took what they could and left and simply never came back. For those who stayed and rebuilt, they feel that now if they want to leave, they cannot.

Gerri Fasold says she does not want to live in her neighborhood but she has too because no one wants to purchase her land. Ten homes in her neighborhood were flooded out when Contenea Creek rose four feet above the 500-year flood mark.

Fasold feels like she cannot move on until her neighbors do.

"I think they need to be gone, but I don't know. We're just stuck," she says.

More than 900 homes in Goldsboro alone had flood damage. Wilson had about 700. It is not too late for people to change their minds and take the buyout.

With 40 percent of Goldsboro in a flood plain, many city leaders hope they do so residents do not ever face the threat of flooding again.


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