Local Politics

Mike Munger Profile

Posted January 9, 2008
Updated January 14, 2008

Age: 49

Place of residence:
Raleigh

Campaign Web site:
http://www.munger08.com

Family:
wife, Donna M. Gingerella (atty, U.S. Treasury Dept); 2 sons: Kevin (18) and Brian (15)

Political experience:
worked as appointee in Reagan administration for Federal Trade Commission (1984-86); served as appointee on Wake County Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Citizens' Liaison Committee (1992-4)

Work experience:
Department of Political Science, Duke University, Durham, NC, Associate Professor, July 1997 to June 2000; full professor, June 2000 to present; Chairman, June 2000 to present; Department of Political Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Assistant Professor, July 1990 to June 1992; Associate Professor with Tenure, July 1992 to June 1997; Director of Master of Public Administration Program, 1993-1995. Department of Government, University of Texas, Austin: Assistant Professor, 1986 to 1990; Department of Economics, Dartmouth College: Visiting Assistant Professor, 1985 to 1986; Federal Trade Commission, Washington, D.C., Staff Economist, 1984 to 1985.

Civic involvement
: Coach for AAU / USSSA Baseball team (15-16 year olds), "Carolina Cardinals"; Coach for five different Raleigh city league teams, various ages, 2001-2005.

Religious affiliation, if any: Catholic; St. Francis of Assisi (Leesville Road)

Favorite movies:
V for Vendetta, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Gone With the Wind

Favorite books: Winston Churchill, The Second World War; Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals; and Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations.

Top 3 Issues Facing NC: 

The next Governor will have to solve difficult problems in education, municipal aggression, and electoral reform.

Our education system wastes money, frustrates teachers, and exasperates parents. Most important, it is failing a generation of North Carolina's children. The solution has three parts.

First, increase choice. Raise the cap on charter schools, and harness the creative power of parents and teachers for the advancement of student interests.

Second, implement a voucher program within five years. Anything that puts more choice in the hands of parents, and gives back some of that tax money so parents can spend it as they see fit, will help the situation.

Third, reduce paperwork and regulatory barriers to teacher licensing and certification. Many people with experience, degrees, and enthusiasm, are prevented from teaching by nonsensical entry barriers.

Municipal aggression: Cities and towns in North Carolina can take property, through eminent domain, within their borders. And they can expand their borders, through involuntary annexation. Both of these abuses of power must be curbed.

Electoral reform: third parties, and new voices of candidates, must be allowed to challenge the status quo. Our state has become corrupt, and our legislature contemptuous of the people. Let new voices be heard.

Why are you the most qualified candidate to be governor?


Under my leadership, North Carolina would loosen the shackles of the great throng of creative, hard-working people who pay their taxes and hope for a better life. My administration would work to improve education funding and choice for parents, particularly in rural and under-served areas. And I would control the aggressive expansion of the powers of municipal governments.

I have worked for government, at both the state and federal levels. I have a record of leadership of both public and private organizations. We have to change government, so we can once again be proud of public service. Right now, our citizens are ashamed of the corruption in the legislature, the highway patrol, and a dozen other state agencies. With the right direction, and a renewed ethic of responsibility to the public and the citizens who pay their salaries, North Carolina state employees can lead the nation in innovation and service.

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