Local leaders inducted into Raleigh Hall of Fame

Posted September 28, 2010

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— Eleven individuals and two organizations were inducted into the Raleigh Hall of Fame on Tuesday night at the Raleigh Convention Center.

WRAL’s Bill Leslie served as the emcee and Raleigh Mayor Charles Meeker honored the following for their contributions to the community:

Earl Johnson Jr. (Founder of Carolina Crane, business leader, supporter of Raleigh’s cultural institutions and events, and instrumental in developing RTI International as a worldwide influence in the business of scientific research.)

Margery Scott “Margie” Johnson (Volunteer for the North Carolina Symphony, NC Museum of History Associates, and other cultural institutions, advocate for the Junior League, United Way, and civic organizations, philanthropist, and health care leader serving Rex Hospital and the Lineberger Cancer Center.)

Dr. Abram Kanof (Physician, scholar, and educator made a singular contribution to Raleigh’s cultural landscape and to interfaith understanding throughout the state through the establishment of the Judaic Art Gallery at the North Carolina Museum of Art.)

John D. “J.D.” Lewis (Broadcaster, community activist, mentor and role model for youth,  leader of the Garner Road YMCA, and the first African American host of a local television program, WRAL’s “Teenage Frolics”.)

James Murchison Peden Sr. (Founder of the award-winning Peden Steel, driver in creation of the Raleigh Junior Chamber of Commerce, leader of Raleigh business, cultural, religious and civic organizations, he influenced the life and direction of Raleigh in the 1940’s, ‘50’s, and 60’s.)

Edward Nelson “Ed” Richards (Real estate developer, mentor, volunteer leader of youth, cultural, and educational institutions, key mover in the evolution of the NC Ports Authority, and pioneer in the development of 18 shopping centers.)

Dr. Prezell Russell Robinson (Educator, civic leader, stalwart in race relations, ambassador to the United Nations, US Department of State emissary to 20 foreign countries, and visionary leader who took St. Augustine’s College to new heights during his longstanding tenure as its president.)

Louise “Scottie” Scott Stephenson (Pioneering matriarch of Capitol Broadcasting Company, patron of the arts, champion of the underprivileged, and vital force in Raleigh’s business, civic, and social communities, she is famous for her leadership in winning Raleigh’s first VHF license, and memorialized through the naming of the Louise “Scottie” Scott Stephenson Amphitheatre at the Raleigh Little Theatre.)

Dr. Banks. C. Talley Jr. (Instrumental in shaping the cultural life of Raleigh through the expansion of arts programs at NC State University including the creation of the Friends of the College performing arts series, development of the NC Symphony Foundation, conservation of historic buildings through Preservation North Carolina, and service to other cultural organizations.)

Wilbert Allen “Pete” Wilder Sr. (Journalist, athlete, lifelong community servant, religious educator, prolific historical resource, and advocate for housing assistance, he spoke eloquently for those who could not speak for themselves, and secured legislative support for the Wake County Council on Aging.)

Ira David Wood III (Award-winning author, playwright and actor, artistic ambassador for Raleigh, iconic founder of Theater in the Park, and beloved perennial “Ebenezer Scrooge,” his achievements and leadership in the theatrical arts have established Raleigh as a national model for local theatre.)

Hospice of Wake County (Addressing the needs of critically ill and dying residents of Raleigh and their families – young and old, rich and poor, black and white, male and female, in all parts of the city – through a comprehensive program of medical care, counseling, and spiritual support to patients and their families.)

Raleigh Jaycees (Through its commitment to developing leaders through service to others, the work of the Raleigh Jaycees has helped to create the Capitol City we know today through its unwavering service to others, including its holiday outreach through Goodfellows, the longest running Jaycee project in the world.)

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  • Mark G Sep 29, 2010

    There are many unsung heroes in Raleigh and around the Triangle who do not get the recognition they deserve. These "well known" recepients should be balanced by those who deserve to be known for their efforts.