Noteworthy

Wheels4Hope provides cars for eight families

Posted June 2, 2010

— Eight North Carolina families will be getting around easier this week thanks to Wheels4Hope, a faith-based, non-profit organization that repairs donated cars and recycles them back into the community.

“It just transforms their lives. You can imagine getting up every day and doing what you do, with all the responsibilities and obligations that you have, but you walk out the door, and you don't have a car,” said John Bush, executive director of Wheels4Hope.

Group puts needy on wheels Group puts needy on wheels

Wheels4Hope helps as many as 40 families a year. They send donated vehicles to local garages, who donate their time and talents to fix them up. Each garage receives a $700 allowance to get the vehicle road worthy. The vehicle is then sold to a deserving family for $500.

“We have other people donate parts in situations like that. It has worked out pretty good. Plus, it's just helping someone out that's had some bad times and all, and it's a little thing that we can do to help the community,” David Blackburn with Triangle Car Care said.

Tesha Barringer and her husband both work, but transportation was a problem. With three children, they leaned on others until Wheels4Hope helped them get a car.

“We do have a couple of church family members that would pick us up and take us, but to have your own (vehicle) is even better,” Barringer said.

Daniel Mauldin said he fell on hard times after struggling with substance abuse. He is sober now and gainfully employed.

“This (vehicle) will allow me to have transportation, of which I haven't had for several years now,” Maudlin said.

“I love it. I'm so elated," Barringer said of her Wheels4Hope car.

Families are recommended for the vehicles by local aid groups. If you would like to donate a car, or get more information, visit the Wheels4Hope Web site.

22 Comments

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  • tracy6 Jun 2, 2:15 p.m.

    "One thing I find amusing is that all of these cars given out are cars nobody with class would own as they appear to be mid 90's GM vehicles... reliable as heck but not classy." Mugu

    To those without transportation, "class" is the last thing on their mind. I work for a repo company and I often find that those with the "classy cars" are the ones that we pick up daily.

  • bronzegoddess40 Jun 2, 1:35 p.m.

    The sad thing is that in a year, these same people will be without cars again as they will fall victim to predatory title loans or just plain ignorance of car maintenance. If they can't afford a car, they can't afford to maintain, insure and register these vehicles. Mugu

    Mugu,how do you know? That could be the case for many people who buy brand new cars. As some of them cannot afford the car that they get and don't know how to maintain them. Also It hink that these folks are not looking to be classy, they need a reliable ride back and forth to work.

  • Mugu Jun 2, 12:18 p.m.

    The sad thing is that in a year, these same people will be without cars again as they will fall victim to predatory title loans or just plain ignorance of car maintenance. If they can't afford a car, they can't afford to maintain, insure and register these vehicles.

    I hope that they go through some kind of money management class and also a class on how to maintain these vehicles as I see so many times where a very inexpensive problem with a car gets ignored and it turns into a major expense.

    One thing I find amusing is that all of these cars given out are cars nobody with class would own as they appear to be mid 90's GM vehicles... reliable as heck but not classy.

  • Wlfpacker Jun 2, 10:51 a.m.

    @paulej--My husband volunteers for Wheels4Hope, and the people who get cars must be referred and recommended to the program by one of the agencies in the area that help the poor. Urban Ministries and Interact are just two of the area ministries that pre-screen and select people who need and are "worthy" of getting the chance to buy a cheap car. So it is highly unlikely that anyone who is not needy could get one of the cars. Wheels4Hope also sells cars to the public when a vehicle that is not appropriate for the program is donated. These vehicles are sold for at least wholesale or higher and this money is used to fund the program.

  • saturn5 Jun 2, 10:48 a.m.

    "As long as you give people will no longer feel they need to earn anything"

    They are not "given" the cars. They have to pay $500. That can be the difference in giving someone enough help for them to help themselves. Their having to pony up $500 also weeks out the lazy people who just want something for nothing.

    This is what charity is supposed to be - people helping others because they WANT to, not because they're forced or obligated to. Of course there is potential for abuse, but I've been there. I was without transportation for about 6 months and had a 30 mile commute to work. I was lucky enough to be able to work out an arrangement with a friend, but not everyone is so lucky. Having transportation available made the difference between keeping a job that has turned into a successful career, or unemployment while I looked for something within walking distance.

  • venitapeyton Jun 2, 10:45 a.m.

    woodrowboyd2, you sound like a strange, bitter person. Ask the unemployed people whose jobs have been sent to foreign countries how long they've been looking for work. Ask the former Conagra workers if they've found employment since the company has decided to move away. Ask our fellow brothers and sisters who are buried under skyrocketing medical bills if they'd like one day to not be harassed for a past due bill, while they hold the hand of a family member who may still be in intensive care. Check out the newly widowed who've lost spouses to Iraq or Afghanistan if they need assistance now that they are one paycheck away from destitution. Then you'd understand the saying of us Christians, "There but for the Lord goeth I".

  • bronzegoddess40 Jun 2, 10:44 a.m.

    Did any of the naysayers truly read the article through and through? They paid for the car $500, it is not a new car, and they couple works. So there was No handout here, No pimped out Escalade was given away for welfare folks with "fiftyleven" children.(Dripping with sarcasm). Excellent program WHEELS4HOPE! How can a person donate cars or things that this organization needs?

  • paulej Jun 2, 10:34 a.m.

    How does this organization prevent "abuse"? What I mean by that is, how do they prevent people who are fully-capable of buying a new or used car from taking the cars when there are those truly in need who should get them first?

  • teachonereachone Jun 2, 10:28 a.m.

    For those who think they will never need anyone's help ever for anything, wait awhile. If you have never had any rain in your life again I say way awhile.

  • Hans Jun 2, 10:14 a.m.

    "As long as you give people will no longer feel they need to earn anything. Where are the friends and family of these people? A non instrest loan would make it better than to just hand someone a car and then pay insurance and tile fees. I can see why no one wants to work and why should they." - woodrowboyd2

    This is what charity is all about. Money is not being forcibly stolen from others and given to these people (like the government does it). These are volunteers donating their time and money because they WANT to help these people out. Believe it or not, there are people who need a little help from time to time to get back on their feet.

    "Think what could have been done with all those perfectly good cars that were sent to the junkyard in cash for clunkers." - Question

    Agreed. It was a complete travesty. Yet another example of how the "noble intentions" of government usually end up screwing the poor.

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