Wake County honors fallen officers

Posted May 12, 2009

Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— Wake County law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty were remembered Tuesday in a public ceremony in downtown Raleigh.

Nineteen fallen officers from the Morrisville Police Department, North Carolina Highway Patrol, Raleigh Police Department, Wake Forest Police Department and the Wake County Sheriff's Office have died on duty since 1922.

Fallen officers remembered Web only: Wake County remembers fallen officers

Raleigh police detective Tom Crabtree was the first officer killed on Sept. 1, 1922. His now-96-year-old son, 1st Sgt. Tom Crabtree Jr. was among those in attendance.

"Our gathering here today honors our commitment to never forget the sacrifice so many have made for us all," Raleigh Police Chief Harry Dolan told a crowd outside the Progress Energy Performing Arts Center in Downtown Raleigh.

The ceremony was marked by a 21-gun salute and a moment of silence for each officer. Sheriff Donnie Harrison read the name of each fallen officer and roses were placed on wreaths in their honor.

"We're a big family. We don't forget each other," Harrison told officers' family members in attendance. "Don't ever think your loved ones will be forgotten."

"You're heroes to us. You protect us, serve us, you risk your lives every day," Raleigh attorney John C. Dorsey told officers. "Thank you for a job well done."

Dorsey, the keynote speaker at Tuesday's remembrance, serves as secretary-treasurer of the 200 Club of Wake County, a volunteer nonprofit organization, which raises money to provide benefits to family members of fallen officers. It does not accept contributions from public safety officers.

Tuesday's ceremony coincided with National Law Enforcement Memorial Week (May 10-16), which observes the service and sacrifice of all American law enforcement officers.


This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • didisaythat May 14, 2009

    It is a shame that the public has more respect for criminals than law enforcement. And don't give me it is all these bad cops thats doing it....That is in the movies. Sure there are bad ones but that is in every profession.

  • oldcorp May 13, 2009

    In my considerable experience gained by decades on the street, I have found the haters like duright or whatever choose that route because they know absolutely and deeply that they could never, in their wildest dreams, perform the complex, difficult, dangerous, and thankless job of being an LEO in today's world.
    A cubicle is much better suited to them, no offense to respectful cubicle-dwellers.

  • retired state trooper May 12, 2009

    First of all ... Thank you to all the families of the law enforcement officers who gave their lives for the protection of Wake County.

    Secondly ... I do have a question in regards to some of the comments made however ...

    How old do you have to be to post a comment on here?

    Some of the comments sound like they came from middleschoolers or younger.

  • fed.up69 May 12, 2009

    Every May usually the 15th memorial services are held in Washington DC to honor Officers from around the country who gave their life in the previous year.I am proud to say that there was about a 23% decrease for 2008.At this memorial a family member places a flower on a wreath in memory of their loved one.North Carolina Fraternal Order of Police was the first state to pay for the closest living relative to attend these services.Not only do they have the memorial service,there are seminars held for families who have lost a loved one so they can start the healing process.They also interact with families who are going through the same problems.I will never forget standing in an elevator in uniform heading to the memorial service when I felt someone tugging on my uniform trouser. It was a 3 year old wanting to know if I was his daddy his mom told him no then she explained that her husband had been killed in the line of duty. This child will never know his dad and what a true HERO he was.

  • Lady Justice May 12, 2009


    Every police officer is not a hero see (Spring Lake P.D.) a hero is one who goes above the call of duty it not about disrespect. I have nothing against anyone but to use them term hero when it does not apply makes no sense."

    This service, nor Firegal was speaking of all law enforcement officers. They were speaking specifically to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice (their lives) to protect strangers. It might have been an automobile accident on the way to a call, or it might be he/she was shot. All those honored today were in fact heroes, IMO.

  • KDT May 12, 2009

    This was a very nice memorial, and I'm glad that Wake County has started this tradition and remembering and honoring those officers that sacrificed their lives (and yes, it does deserve all LEO's deserve appreciation and respect, that they rarely get). Those of you who don't have a family member in law enforcement (or clearly don't like LE), just think if a loved one was just shot point blank and killed one day (really, for no reason)...maybe that loved one was trying to protect someone else? Well, that would be pretty honorable don't come on this blog trying to stir up know nothing until you're put into a situation and faced with it.

    Thank you officers for serving and protecting!

  • grenlyn1 May 12, 2009

    Mrduright...let me clear something up for you...Just because there are some who CHOSE to not follow the rules doesn't make all of the apples rotten..this is true in every walks of life...especially those who give so much and recieve so little. I for one think if one good soldier, officer, firefighter or person is lost then we have lost ALOT. And just because some of those people aren't honorable, we should not neglect the hard work and devotion of all. It is not up to me to it up to you???? I think not!

  • mrduright May 12, 2009


    Every police officer is not a hero see (Spring Lake P.D.) a hero is one who goes above the call of duty it not about disrespect. I have nothing against anyone but to use them term hero when it does not apply makes no sense.

  • Firegal May 12, 2009

    I can stand the heat, the disrespect is a different story. These officers were Heroes and deserve to be treated with utmost respect. And those currently in public service fields deserve respect as well.

  • mrduright May 12, 2009


    yeah my typing and the "Hot Sign"