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NC Zoo buying old-growth forest

Posted December 1, 2011

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— The North Carolina Zoo is buying a 110-acre tract in Montgomery County that is home to thousands of old-growth longleaf pine trees, officials said Thursday.

The state-supported zoo is using private donations and a grant from the Natural Heritage Trust Fund to finance the purchase from a family who has owned the land for more than 100 years, said Nell Allen, plant curator at the zoo. She said the purchase is expected to close by the end of December.

The Asheboro zoo is trying to expand its mission beyond animals to preserve native plants and educate people about them, Allen said.

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  • mhazouri Dec 6, 2011

    Terrific.

  • NCgirllovescats Dec 5, 2011

    Loblolly pines grow back fast, they are kind of a weedy tree. But longleaf pine does not grow back at all without management since they are fire-dependent. And then they are moderate growers.

  • fourfivesix Dec 5, 2011

    Trees, especially pine trees, grow back. Pine trees grow back really fast. If we stopped cutting all the trees down, you won't have any nice furniture, paper (the kind you write on as well as the kind you wipe with), wood flooring, etc. You people need an education in forestry & sustainable practices.

    @kohammer, what does their wildlife center have to do with these trees?

    @YeaOh, did you read the article at all? It says the land is being bought with private donations & a grant. Not tax money.

  • Chairman of the Bored Dec 2, 2011

    "Government gone wild. There are already a number of land trusts in NC. What's with a zoo getting into that business? Another tax payer burden by a government agency over reaching."
    -YeahOh

    Re-read the article Einstein.
    How great for them to have the donations and a grant to obtain this old-growth forest. It'd be a shame for it to be leveled for pulp and a cookie cutter subdivision in the next decades.

  • shutterbug Dec 2, 2011

    I think it is a good idea for someone to buy it. Keep loggers from coming in and cutting it down with no respect for the future of the area.

  • lmbl Dec 2, 2011

    I am so glad the zoo is buying this property instead of cutting down the trees and turning them into wood chips shipped to China like they have in Eastern North Carolina.

  • YeaOh Dec 2, 2011

    Government gone wild. There are already a number of land trusts in NC. What's with a zoo getting into that business? Another tax payer burden by a government agency over reaching.

  • kohammer Dec 1, 2011

    They already have a great wildlife rehab center where they take in, treat and rehabilitate injured and orphaned native wildlife.