Wake County Schools

Transit sales tax gets the vote; some mayors ousted

Posted November 9, 2011

— Voters in two counties approved sales tax hikes to support transit and education initiatives, while incumbents and challengers battled for mayoral seats across the region Tuesday.

Voters in the Bull City made their voices heard in the race for Durham mayor.

Incumbent Bill Bell was elected to his sixth term, easily beating Rev. Sylvester Williams with 18,581 votes, or 82 percent. Williams received 3,990 votes.

Bell said Tuesday night that he's not focused on how many times he's been re-elected but on the opportunity to serve.

"I enjoy the work that I do. It's really been an honor and a privilege for me to be able to serve," he said. "I tell people over and over again that I'm in Durham by choice and not by chance."

Bell supported two referendums for local sales taxes on the ballot.

A countywide measure for a half-cent sales tax increase to be used for transit needs, including commuter rail to Wake County and light rail to Orange County, passed by 60 percent with 98 percent of precincts reporting.

In the city of Durham, 57 percent of voters supported a quarter-cent sales and use tax for education. In Orange County, voters approved a similar tax that's expected to raise about $2.5 million for the county.

In Fayetteville, Mayor Tony Chavonne was elected to a fourth term, defeating challenger Nat Robertson. Chapel Hill Mayor Mark Kleinschmidt also won his re-election bid against challengers Tim Sookram and Kevin Wolff. Durham voters re-elect Bell, OK local sales taxes Durham voters re-elect Bell, OK local sales taxes

Apex Mayor Keith Weatherly, Fuquay-Varina Mayor John Byrne, Knightdale Mayor Russell Killen, Garner Mayor Ronnie Williams and Rolesville Mayor C. Frank Eagles were re-elected.

In Wendell, however, Mayor Harold Broadwell was defeated by challenger Timothy Hinnant. Hope Mills Mayor Eddie Dees lost to Jackie Warner, and Spring Lake's longtime Mayor Ehthel Clark lost to Chris Rey.

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  • fayncmike Nov 10, 8:08 a.m.

    ""How is this a handout? I voted yesterday for YES, I'm willing to pay a little more for a service I would like to use."

    The two new GOP buzz words are, "handout" and "entitlement." Their use doesn't really have to mean a thing. They just sound good to closed minded whiners.

  • tlg0022 Nov 9, 7:40 p.m.

    "How is this a handout? I voted yesterday for YES, I'm willing to pay a little more for a service I would like to use.

    I'm confused on the handout part."- Because most of the people that use these services don't even pay taxes. How often do use the DATA bus or see more than 5 people on a bus?

  • fayncmike Nov 9, 5:59 p.m.

    "The poor and those who cannot drive? It lets the poor get to where the jobs are and helps them get off welfare and it allows those who cannot drive get to the shops, entertainment, doctors etc.

    Civilization isn't free.
    haggis bashe"

    It's more then just that. It's to encourage people to use mass transit instead of their huge pollution spewing cars. That's one of the biggest things about it.

  • unc70 Nov 9, 4:49 p.m.

    Over the last 30 years, our society has suffered great harm on many levels because our public discourse is distracted from and often loses sight of the "public good" in its myopic focus on "lower taxes" and "higher profits". Led by the media and politicians, every issue is framed as competing sides, as R vs D. While we argue, our savings and investments for the future are being siphoned by the rich and powerful, helped by elected officials of both parties.

    The frustrations behind the TP and OWS are much the same, differing in who is to blame. Bigger issue is what future do we want, how do we get there.

    The economic theory (mostly Chicago) justifying policies is inadequate, flawed, and misused. Too much competition 0-sum (my gain is your loss), not cooperation that increases what is shared by all, though not equally.

    Rule for sustainable societies: When everyone has enough, anyone can have more.

    Otherwise, freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose.

  • loprestw Nov 9, 3:15 p.m.

    who cares when the majority of the voters live in free government housing collecting welfare and food stamps and working on who to rob or shoot!!

  • Plenty Coups Nov 9, 2:53 p.m.

    "according to liberals that is not the case...because whn taxes are raised on businesses, or in this case a landlord, that cost is NOT passed on to the consumer."

    Taxes are passed on to some extent. Where you get confused is trying to call everyone who sees a necessity for taxes "liberal". You also don't consider the level of increase in taxes as a percentage of a person's or businesses income. A $1000 tax increase on a business making 50 million won't really have an impact.

    "Therefore you are wrong by your own logic."

    Actually its your logic.

  • arfamr1007 Nov 9, 2:53 p.m.

    Okay...and they don't include the costs of employees and upkeep too, right?

    BTW, that is not my logic and don't get upset when three different people prove you wrong in a row. {{laughing uncontrollably}}
    WooHoo2You

    it IS your logic...you support Obama's call to tax corporations right? Same principle here.

  • WooHoo2You Nov 9, 2:39 p.m.

    according to liberals that is not the case...because whn taxes are raised on businesses, or in this case a landlord, that cost is NOT passed on to the consumer. Therefore you are wrong by your own logic. Landlords do not include taxes in rent. Thanks for trying though...{{snicker}}-arfamr1007

    Okay...and they don't include the costs of employees and upkeep too, right?

    BTW, that is not my logic and don't get upset when three different people prove you wrong in a row. {{laughing uncontrollably}}

  • arfamr1007 Nov 9, 2:26 p.m.

    Being the landlords pay property tax it is worked into their rent.
    WooHoo2You

    according to liberals that is not the case...because whn taxes are raised on businesses, or in this case a landlord, that cost is NOT passed on to the consumer. Therefore you are wrong by your own logic. Landlords do not include taxes in rent. Thanks for trying though...{{snicker}}

  • arfamr1007 Nov 9, 2:24 p.m.

    They do. It's called "rent". The owner pays for the property taxes through part of the rent charge.
    Plenty Coups

    lol...really? really? no wait,... really?

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