Education

Freshmen flood NC college campuses despite bleak jobs forecast

Posted August 13, 2011
Updated August 14, 2011

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— Incoming college freshmen flooded the Triangle's college campuses for "move-in weekend" on Saturday, but say they're worried that after a dreary week on Wall Street, they could become "Generation Jobless."

Despite a bleak outlook on jobs, many parents still say that a four-year degree, which can cost well over $100,000 at the state's public universities, is a worthy investment.

"There aren't any jobs; that's why we told him (to study) engineering and ROTC Air Force to make the best choices he can make," said Kathy Suleski, whose son Henry is an incoming freshman at North Carolina State University.

He's taking his mother's advice seriously.

"I was leaning toward engineering because I know their engineering program here is really good, but I'm going to see where the first year takes me and go from there," Henry Suleski said. Freshmen flood NC college campuses despite bleak jobs forecast Freshmen flood NC college campuses despite bleak jobs forecast

Unemployment rates for recent college graduates are at an all-time high, a statistic that has the Rosenbaums worried.

"Yes, I'd like a roof over my head and some food," said N.C. State freshman Lindsey Rosenbaum, who plans to major in history.

"When we were looking at what classes she was going to take, the focus right away was, 'Where is this going to get me long-term?'" her father, Dan Rosenbaum, said.

For upperclassmen who are nearing graduation, though, the economic forecast is all the more urgent.

"I'm (still) hopeful I'll get a job," said Lifford Pinto, a third-year graduate student in computer science.

But if the current jobs trend continues, Henry Suleski hopes he won't be back at his parent's house come graduation.

"I'm hoping to get a job because that's the last thing I want to do – move back in with my parents," he said.

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  • Pseudonym Aug 15, 2011

    Quote from scifion: "I think the challenge to university graduates is not about finding a job, but to continue to use their brains to do more than earn a living."

    +1!

    The learning doesn't stop when you put on the dress and the square hat with the nose tickler and walk across the stage to get that piece of paper.

  • scifion Aug 15, 2011

    I think the challenge to university graduates is not about finding a job, but to continue to use their brains to do more than earn a living. Sometimes the payback is immediate, with advances and rewards in a field pertaining to their course of study, and other times the payback can be many years down the road when they themselves create jobs. I don't encourage young people to go to college, but to look at themselves and see where they want to be in the future, and what tools they need to get there. Some will see vocational school or a classical apprenticeship as a means to achieve those ends. Others will serve in the military. What ever they may decide, I would encourage an approach of lifelong learning; there is a great deal we can teach ourselves by asking questions and seeking answers others have already answered, or have outlined a process we can follow or modify to find the answers. In those answers we find progress, both within ourselves, and for each other.

  • Statick Aug 15, 2011

    "I cant think of anything that would get this country back on track."

    ...And defeatist attitudes like this is why America is in trouble. Too many people complaining too much about what's wrong with everything else and no cojones to come up with new solutions to solve anything.

  • Viewer Aug 15, 2011

    LUV2Camp, I am a liberal arts type who would still be in Florida if there had been jobs there when I graduated. I moved to where there were job openings, and moved several times after that and never flipped a burger for pay since.

  • superman Aug 15, 2011

    Dont think a degree in history is going to do much for your pocketbook. They best graduate from the 5th grade. After that train to work a fast food cash register or flip burgers. Thousands of people are out of work with college degrees and excellent work experience. The USA is on its way down-- so much federal debt that we will be bankrupt in a couple years. Very few of us will live long enough to see this country recover--that is if it ever does! No money no jobs-- no jobs no money! I cant think of anything that would get this country back on track.

  • skaternum Aug 15, 2011

    Crazy idea: whatever happened to the notion of getting a college education to become ... I dunno ... EDUCATED? It's not vocational training. It's supposed to teach you about the world around you and how to think critically about it. If you want vocational training, go to a vocational school or just go get certifications.

  • I know some stuff Aug 15, 2011

    while a degree is no longer a guarantee of many open doors, it doesn't hurt, BUT, make sure it's in something useful or productive.....eg. engineers make/design things, HVAC & Car tech's repair things....there's always demand for those. Degrees in History, literature, or archeology as examples...not so useful, so study these with your expectations tempered by reality.

  • jaydosse Aug 15, 2011

    @pirate09 "As one of the youngest employees in my department I am also a go to person for anything needed and any questions. "

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    As a form of unsolicited advice, let me say that as the years go by you may find that your above sense of pride may come back to bite you real hard. I can only suggest that in the work a day world the approach you adhere to may not always prove to be rewarding. Proceed with caution and good luck. Watch your back!!

  • pirate09 Aug 15, 2011

    So as a member of the generation graduating throughout this recession I can say that it is tough right now. The bright side is that if you have the drive and determination to be where you want to be after graduation it will come. You may have to move home, but dont think of it as failure, we cannot change what happened while we were in high school and how the economy was. I may be underemployed, but the bright side is..I am employed and can afford what I need. I graduated with my Bachelors in Finance in 2009 and yes I moved home for a couple months, but instead of being like many in the same situation and just slacking off and going out, I worked day and night applying for jobs, intervieweing and eventually received an offer with a top company in the area. As one of the youngest employees in my department I am also a go to person for anything needed and any questions. Times like these take hard work and in the long run, persistence pays profits!

    Also to whomever said my generati

  • anne53ozzy Aug 15, 2011

    MY Words to the young ones....Go ahead and get your education and thrive with it!!!! Keep your heads up and your conscience clear. You did not make this mess. You can and I know you will address it and in time fix it. God Bless all of you.

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