Education

Home schooling doubles in N.C. over a decade

Posted August 2, 2010

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— The number of North Carolina students being home-schooled has more than doubled over the last decade, according to data released Monday by the state Division of Non-Public Education.

In the 2009-10 school year, more than 81,000 children attended more than 43,000 home schools – defined as "a non-public school in which one or more children of not more than two families or households receive academic instruction from parents or legal guardians, or a member of either household.”

That number is up from about 28,000 students in 16,000 schools in 1999-2000 and 809 students in 381 schools in 1985-86, the first year for which data is available.

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  • Plenty Coups Aug 5, 2010

    " understand that's my opinion, but you obviously also have yours. You are the most dedicated apologist for the NC EOG's I've ever met."

    Actually, I hate the things. I really do. Too much time is wasted in NC testing, retesting, and preparing for the thing. It all started in the mid 1990s w/ an "accountability" movement. They need to give the tests once, at the end of the year, and only make it a large percentage of the kid's grade. This pass/fail high stakes, month long process is just wrong.

  • Plenty Coups Aug 5, 2010

    "I've debated you now for days providing ample evidence that homeschool education can and very often does provide a superior education for students."

    I think we disagee on this obviously. We're talking about different sets of tests, different types of kids. I agree that you have proven that some home schooled kids do well on nationally normed tests. Again, if all NC public school kids took the same test as all home schooled kids w/ the same test setup, I would agree. Wouldn't you? Also, don't you at least see it's unfair to compare a poor inner city youth's test scores w/ an affluent child and proclaim that the affluent child's education is better w/o allowing for the upbringing?

  • Plenty Coups Aug 5, 2010

    clover-"Most high-end private schools also don't use the NC EOG's, rather they use nationally-normed tests, but their superior scores are not in dispute. Only someone with a rigid political agenda would call their superior scores into question, just as only someone with a rigid political agenda would call into question the nationally-normed test scores of homeschool students.'

    I actually do like debating w/ you clover. At least you keep at it rather than some people who just throw out political talking points and then vanish. I would be in favor of a natl. test if there was only one and everyone had to take it under the same circumstances. I believe there isn't one because states have traditionally been the ones to handle education. Ironically, I think a lot of conservatives would see it as the fed. govt. once again meddling in something they don't belong. But that would be the only way it would happen.

  • wildcat Aug 5, 2010

    Maybe everyone should home-school their child. Then there would not be a need for public school and their issues. All problem would be solved. Are would they?

  • wildcat Aug 5, 2010

    I pray that those who do home-school their children are really qualified. If not, you can do more harm than good.

  • Clover Aug 5, 2010

    Plenty Coups, I've debated you now for days providing ample evidence that homeschool education can and very often does provide a superior education for students. I've also provided reputable research that proves just that. But you keep presenting the same, tired argument that performance can't be determined unless all students take the same (NC EOG's) test. I really do find that to be a silly argument.

    Further YOU are the only person I've ever "met" in ANY context to continually advance such a frivolous argument.

    Most high-end private schools also don't use the NC EOG's, rather they use nationally-normed tests, but their superior scores are not in dispute. Only someone with a rigid political agenda would call their superior scores into question, just as only someone with a rigid political agenda would call into question the nationally-normed test scores of homeschool students.

    Good luck with your life.

  • Clover Aug 5, 2010

    "You live here in NC and cannot accurately compare your child's education to other NC students."

    -----

    I can compare my students performance to other students in NC who take the Iowa and Woodkock (many of whom attend high-quality private schools), AND to other students in other states, while YOU cannot.

    Since my oldest son has taken the NC EOG's AND the Iowa, and I've proctored both, I prefer the Iowa (in my view it's a better test AND it's nationally-normed).

    I understand that's my opinion, but you obviously also have yours. You are the most dedicated apologist for the NC EOG's I've ever met. Congratulations!

  • Plenty Coups Aug 5, 2010

    "It might surprise you to learn that Franklin Academy, that very reputable charter school, also uses the Iowa Achievement Test with their high school students. It is an enormously popular test and a darn good one. I know because I've classroom proctored the test (and not for my children), which was forbidden."
    I've known teachers who worked at Franklin. They say their methods of teaching are tightly controlled. They also don't put up w/ discipline issues. (that's good but hardly fair since public schools can't just kick out kids) Franklin does achieve good test results, but they make that their focus(admittedably, in this test crazy time, a lot of public schools do also. Most significantly, the school has tiny numbers of minorities and low income students. This doesn't compare to the general popul. in NC. Interesting enough, my children's public school annually meets or exceeds Franklin's EOG scores (at least they take them) despite having much larger numbers of low income students.

  • Plenty Coups Aug 5, 2010

    "And, then, Plenty Coups those in northeastern or western or mid-western (well, you get the idea) states could make the same argument you are making regarding the scores -- that they are not an accurate match-up -- and they would have a point."

    THe problem is again, there are more than one "nationally normed" tests. Some (such as the CAT) have very dubious standards. (They can be administered by the parents) I guarantee if you took all of them you would get different scores. They are designed to rank the students who actually took the tests. Until there is one national test, meaningful results are in question. You live here in NC and cannot accurately compare your child's education to other NC students.

  • Clover Aug 4, 2010

    And, then, Plenty Coups those in northeastern or western or mid-western (well, you get the idea) states could make the same argument you are making regarding the scores -- that they are not an accurate match-up -- and they would have a point.

    This cannot be argued for the Iowa, Wood*ock, Stanford, California and other tests approved for NC homeschoolers because they "farm" data from all 50 states.

    It might surprise you to learn that Franklin Academy, that very reputable charter school, also uses the Iowa Achievement Test with their high school students. It is an enormously popular test and a darn good one. I know because I've classroom proctored the test (and not for my children), which was forbidden.

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