Education

Tuition hikes approved for public universities

Posted July 14, 2010
Updated July 17, 2010

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— After consulting with chancellors and University of North Carolina Board of Governors, UNC President Erskine Bowles on Wednesday approved supplemental tuition increases for the 2010-11 academic year.

These increases – authorized by a special provision in the 2010-11 state budget and averaging $444 per year – will be used to help offset an extra $70 million in state budget cuts.

The increases are in addition to a $200 increase approved last year by state lawmakers. Under guidelines for that increase, each campus had to raise tuition by the lesser of 8 percent or $200, with the extra revenue going to the state's General Fund.

As a result, in-state undergraduates will see an average 15.5 percent increase in tuition and required fees for the fall semester.

In every UNC campus, at least half of the revenues from the initial tuition increase and 20 percent of revenues from the supplemental increase will be targeted to need-based financial aid.

The amount of increase varies across the state. In-state undergraduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill will see an increase of $750 and N.C. State will see an increase of $700. For a complete list of tuition increases at the system's 16 higher education campuses, visit the UNC website.

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  • 5Rs Jul 15, 2010

    And this is the guy who will lead the effort to rein in the fed budget deficit? He obviously has an easy answer: Raise the levy on the people. Don't say you weren't warned.

  • ncguy Jul 15, 2010

    I thought State schools were for the people of the state? How about raising the out of state the total differance? Nope again Bowles looks out for others outside the state.

    Must be nice making 500K a year for making easy decisions and not finding the money within the budget.

    typical democrat...

  • edith wharton Jul 15, 2010

    A 15.5 percent increase is tough when one spouse is umemployed and the other gets a 3% increase - after no increase last year. It's hard enough trying to keep up with inflation. One thing is for sure: when state revenues increase, tuition will NOT decrease.

  • BubbaDuke Jul 15, 2010

    If our legislators would leave the education budget alone and not reduce it by the amount of lottery money that comes in, then maybe an education could be affordable. At this rate, a college education is more liability than an asset.

  • wwyoud Jul 15, 2010

    "at least half of the revenues from the initial tuition increase and 20 percent of revenues from the supplemental increase will be targeted to need-based financial aid." So they could have reduced the increase by half for everyone, instead of making middle and upper class student pay extra?! These days, an extra $700 is a BIG deal, and no guarantee that it won't go up again next year. The state is making it very hard to plan for college anymore...maybe they should refuse anyone needing remedial classes and send them to the community colleges so the school can concentrate on those who are ready for a 4-year college.