Education

Wake school test scores 'show improvement'

Posted July 14, 2010

Wake County Public School System
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— Wake County Public School System leaders announced Wednesday that preliminary End-of-Grade and End-of-Course test scores for 2009-10 "show improvement in virtually every subgroup of students."

Officials also noted that the gap in scores between white students and black, Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students narrowed at several grade levels and that 85 percent of students taking EOC tests passed those exams.

"These improvements are a clear indication that our efforts since the 2007 curriculum management audit of better alignment and focus of resources and efforts are paying important dividends," Donna Hargens, interim superintendent and chief academic officer, said in a statement. "The teacher collaboration made possible by our professional learning teams and their focus on data are showing results with these test score gains."

EOG Reading
In reading, every grade level (3-8) showed improvement in the percentage of students proficient, with 76.5 percent meeting the standard overall. When broken down by subgroup, all groups except students with limited English proficiency showed improvement, with the largest growth shown by American Indian, black, Hispanic, students with disabilities and economically disadvantaged students.

EOG Math
In math, four of the six grades tested showed improvement, with the greatest gains made by seventh- and eighth-grade students. Third- and sixth-graders each showed a 0.3 percent decline in proficiency. Overall, 85.5 percent of students were proficient. Broken down by subgroup, the largest growth was shown by black, Hispanic, students with disabilities and economically disadvantaged students.

EOC Testing
Six of the eight End-of-Course tests – all but biology and civics and economics – show improvement over the previous year. When factoring retests, all eight subject areas showed gains. The five required core area tests also showed improvement. Most subgroups showed improvement over the previous year on initial testing and all groups, except students with limited English proficiency, showed improvement after re-testing compared to the previous year.

About EOG and EOC tests
End-of-Grade tests are given to students in grades three through eight in reading and mathematics. Students in grades five and eight also take a science EOG test. End-of-Course tests are most usually given at the high school level for first-year English, algebra, biology, chemistry, geometry, physical science, civics and economics and U.S. history.

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  • Riddickfield Jul 14, 2010

    Wow! Just the promise of an end to busing has improved scores.

  • teacher56 Jul 14, 2010

    So WCPSS has improved all scores! Way to go! Now let us wait and see what the destruction of our fine school system will produce with the new changes the five new board members will do over the next few years! The scores should go WAY up! And if it doesn't than we will know why!

  • Not_So_Dumb Jul 14, 2010

    MARX - If you child is proficient at an eight grade level while in third grade (there are no tests for second grade, which is why I changed it) that means that he is rated at a level 4 - exceeds proficiency. Proficiency is a score of 3 or above, so he would be listed as proficient for third grade.

    There are cumulative reports and cohort reports. The data cited by this article is preliminary. The full reports will be out sometime, which will allow us to do that.

    AFAIK, the measures are valid for what they measure. Whether or not what they define as third grade reading level is necessarily a meaningful standard, is another matter entirely. The whole 'dumbing down' phenomenon that is another subject entirely.

  • MARX Jul 14, 2010

    "Actually, I wasn't making that argument. I was just noting that the idea that parents would put money into a school for things like a teacher's bonus isn't preposterous."

    I understand, although wouldn't it be nice if every school had that incentive? Community schools or diverse schools, if the teachers, children, and parents don't have or "see" the incentive the inequities are likely to continue. Sorry...got off topic.

    Not_So_..do you know if the measures are valid? For example my kid reads on an 8th grade level but is in second grade. Does that mean my kid is not proficient in 2nd grade when these figures are generated? Wouldn't a cumulative and cohort based report be more reliable? Obviously we can all play with the stats...I do love the bikini reference :)

  • Not_So_Dumb Jul 14, 2010

    Tawny, I don't see the 2009-10 data anywhere. Please provide a direct link.

  • Tawny Jul 14, 2010

    If you log onto the State DPI website, you will be able to see how Wake County students compare with other students across the state, NotSo.

  • Not_So_Dumb Jul 14, 2010

    "The belief that proximity will invalidate the excuse that a parent's is too far away to participate in their child's education."- MARX

    Actually, I wasn't making that argument. I was just noting that the idea that parents would put money into a school for things like a teacher's bonus isn't preposterous.

  • MARX Jul 14, 2010

    "Right or wrong, when people have a vested interest in their school, they will try to make a positive difference. I have seen it as both parent and teacher."
    Isn't that what the big debate is really about? The belief that proximity will invalidate the excuse that a parent's is too far away to participate in their child's education.

    Getting back to the topic, please keep in mind, the test has not stayed consistent from year to year, there's no way to compare historical data. If someone wants to complain about wasted money, time, effort and meaningless data.....

  • Coastal89 Jul 14, 2010

    Well you have to remember they had to fix the EOG's from last year because too many failed.....So take with a grain of salt on the new report.

  • Remy Jul 14, 2010

    "they can't see how parents can't drop their job and run to the school every week." Aunt Betty

    You are always telling everyone to reprioritize their lives so they can take and pick up their children if the busses stop running. Interesting how you change your tune when it suits your needs.

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