Education

Former principal could lose license in grade-changing scandal

Posted May 14, 2010

Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— A grade-changing scandal that rocked the North Carolina high school football playoffs in December affected more than 30 students, including four athletes, Cumberland County Schools Superintendent Frank Till Jr. said Friday.

Diane Antolak resigned as principal at Fayetteville's Terry Sanford High School in March after a four-month suspension during an investigation into allegations that she changed the grades of a football player.

The football team was forced to forfeit its nine regular-season wins after the school reported the use of the ineligible player, and the team played in the first round of the 4-A playoffs only after a court challenge. The North Carolina High School Athletic Association voided the team's victory, ending its season.

The investigation into Antolak's actions revealed she tampered with the transcripts of an additional 28 students, Till said.

Antolak was meeting Friday with the state Advisory Committee on Teacher Ethics, which will decide whether to reprimand her or to suspend her license to teach in North Carolina. 

The committee's recommendation, expected next week, will be passed on to state Superintendent of Public Instruction June Atkinson for her approval. Atkinson will inform Antolak of her decision by letter, said a spokeswoman for the state Department of Public Instruction.

22 Comments

This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • graciemayj May 14, 2010

    Yeah, I have to agree. That's way way too many. How disappointing!

  • georgegray May 14, 2010

    "Why is it so unusual that in a huge school, 0.01% of students would require a legitimate grade change?" - graciemayj

    Actually, 30 students makes up about 2% of Terry Sanford HS's population (i.e. 200 times the percent you stated). Two out of every one hundred students. That might not seem like a lot, but in the case of a principal feeling the need to override the classroom teacher's judgment (without consulting the teacher) that IS a VERY large number.

  • Adelinthe May 14, 2010

    miketroll - "...but teachers are told by administration in my school to give no grades below a 65 on report cards."

    I was once told to do something similar on my overtime hours. I did, but I kept my own records too where my hours were recorded correctly - just in case the fit ever hit the shan about it.

    God bless.

    RB

  • Adelinthe May 14, 2010

    If she lied (falsified), she durn well should lose her license AND be fired for unethical behavior.

    God bless.

    RB

  • graciemayj May 14, 2010

    Why is it so unusual that in a huge school, 0.01% of students would require a legitimate grade change? On a completely different note, the state department of public instruction holds ME responsible for Johnny's low grade, and I am under intense pressure to take responsibility for students who WON'T (vs can't) perform well. What's going to happen when they tie students' test scores directly to teachers' salaries? I only stay in this profession because of the high caliber of my school and because of my love for my profession.

  • miketroll3572 May 14, 2010

    Okay. Being a teacher myself, let me clue the public in on a little secret. Not that I'm saying it is okay to do, but teachers are told by administration in my school to give no grades below a 65 on report cards. Therefore, a child may have earned a low grade such as a 42, but I am required to change his/her grade to a 65 on the report card. Even if the child turns in no work or hasn't earned the 65, I am still required to give them a 65. Again, I am not trying to say what this principal did was morally right. However, teachers change students' grades all the time.

    And that my friends is why I never support teachers getting a pay raise! Changing the grades just makes the schools and teachers look good when they are NOT!

  • graciemayj May 14, 2010

    When grade changes occur (infrequently) at my school, it is because the principal and the guidance counselor decided it was best for the student. Their decisions are based on information about the student that may not be available to me. Because I'm certain of their integrity and of their respect for my teaching, I've never been offended. Do we need to know more about why the decisions were made? How big is this school? 30 isn't much at a very large school.

  • Boostershot May 14, 2010

    It happens all the time folks. There should be a full blown investigation througout the system.

  • odarkshineo May 14, 2010

    Not sure why there is a debate whether to take her license or not. Despite how the school system currently works above all we should be teaching morality, accountability and work ethic.

  • ncmidteacher May 14, 2010

    Okay. Being a teacher myself, let me clue the public in on a little secret. Not that I'm saying it is okay to do, but teachers are told by administration in my school to give no grades below a 65 on report cards. Therefore, a child may have earned a low grade such as a 42, but I am required to change his/her grade to a 65 on the report card. Even if the child turns in no work or hasn't earned the 65, I am still required to give them a 65. Again, I am not trying to say what this principal did was morally right. However, teachers change students' grades all the time.

More...