Education

Wake Student Assignment Committee makes small changes to multi-year plan

Posted March 18, 2010
Updated March 22, 2010

Wake County Public School System
Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— The Student Assignment Committee of the Wake County Board of Education held its first meeting Thursday, focusing on adjustments to multi-year assignment plans in several communities.

The committee, made up of board members and citizens, reviewed items suggested by parents during public forums and through an online questionnaire.

"It hasn't been terribly hard because they are reasonable requests," board member Carolyn Morrison said.

Wake committee tackles school assignments Wake committee tackles school assignments

Board member John Tedesco said the committee's decisions mostly keep existing year-round schools and magnet schools as they are.

The committee approved seven changes from the more than 20 considered, many of which came from parents who want their children to go to schools closer to home, board member Debra Goldman said.

Wake County student assignment committee’s recommended changes

The changes would take effect in the 2010-2011 school year, the second year of the current three-year student assignment plan. They still must be approved by the entire board.

Goldman and other members of the board's majority – a faction in favor of changing the district's student assignment policy – said Thursday's decisions are the first small moves toward assigning students to schools within "community zones."

The current policy assigns students to schools to achieve socio-economic diversity by  ensuring that no school has more than 40 percent of students receiving free or reduced-price lunch. It has come under fire for separating students and parents physically from their schools and imposing long bus rides and repeated reassignments on some. 

The idea of changing the policy sparked outrage from proponents of the current system, including the state chapter of the NAACP, who threatened to sue, likening the plan to school policies in Wayne and Mecklenburg counties, where it claims segregation does exist.

Over the next nine to 15 months, board members will work on changes to the entire assignment policy.

27 Comments

This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • superman Mar 19, 2010

    The people in this county will never ever ever allow neighborhood schools. The board better have plenty of money to spend on legal defense. Neighborhood schools are to promote segregation. I am going to make a sizeable contribution to the NAACP to assist them in their legal fees. The board is dead in the water.

  • wildcat Mar 19, 2010

    Put God first and the answer will come in how to handle the school situation. Leaving God out will just heap on more problems.

  • ezLikeSundayMorning Mar 19, 2010

    Tip of the day: Ignore button. I find it good for my blood pressure. ;)

  • hardwork919 Mar 19, 2010

    "hardwork: I've seen the 3% as well, just don't know if it's valid. If it is accurate, is this all much-to-do about nothing? But again, since the 40% F&R policy didn't appear to be even close to being met, I assume the percentage bussed could have been much higher. Or it could be even lower. Apparently, it's the well-to-do parent that doesn't want their kid bussed. Those deemed less well off seem to want things to stay the same. I don't care what they end up deciding, somebody is getting on a bus." Garnerwolf1

    And that's what it boils down to... SOMEBODY will be getting on the bus and that's just the bottom line... I don't think "diversity" schools were fully implemented seeing as how only 3% of students were actually bussed, as well as many reports that the 40% FRL guideline wasn't followed... some were was high as 70%... but time will tell if this neighborhood school thing works... I personally don't think it will but I'm still willing to be proven wrong if it does.

  • Garnerwolf1 Mar 19, 2010

    hardwork: I've seen the 3% as well, just don't know if it's valid. If it is accurate, is this all much-to-do about nothing? But again, since the 40% F&R policy didn't appear to be even close to being met, I assume the percentage bussed could have been much higher. Or it could be even lower. Apparently, it's the well-to-do parent that doesn't want their kid bussed. Those deemed less well off seem to want things to stay the same. I don't care what they end up deciding, somebody is getting on a bus.

  • ratherbnnc Mar 19, 2010

    Well, Looks like these citizens who were nominated by the Board members may be a little questionable. District 1 Robert Bridges is a good friend and campaign supporter of Chris Malone. I can name a couple of others who friends are serving on this committee. Seriously, if your going to have a dialogue at least pick people who are not in your hip pocket. It makes the process look bad!

  • hardwork919 Mar 19, 2010

    Garnerwolf1, I think the stats on kids being bussed was about 3%. Don't quote me on that though; I'm trying to remember from something I read a few weeks back.

  • Killian Mar 19, 2010

    "My kids isn't in WCPSS, so I don't have a vested interest here, but I do have a question, if I may, to both sides."

    With apologies for my egregious typo. =) My KID, not kids.

  • Remy Mar 19, 2010

    "If all you are doing is being a "proponent" of every thing this new board is doing, go on vacation. And stay a while." time4real

    Perhaps you need to do something better with your time. Perhaps get an education? As you can see below, proponent means to agree. Perhaps you mean "opponent"...

    pro·po·nent 
    1.a person who argues in favor of something; an advocate.
    2.a person who supports a cause or doctrine; adherent.

  • Killian Mar 19, 2010

    My kids isn't in WCPSS, so I don't have a vested interest here, but I do have a question, if I may, to both sides.

    What do you guys think of the proposal to split the district up to alleviate the size issues?

More...