Education

Wake voters get say in Wake Tech expansion plan

Posted August 6, 2012

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The Wake County Board of Commissioners agreed Monday to put a proposed $200 million bond issue to fund expansion at Wake Technical Community College before the voters. The bond referendum will appear on the November ballot.

Wake Tech would use the $200 million in general obligation bonds to build a new campus, the school's sixth, in Morrisville. The state's second-largest community college serves more than 65,000 students and has more than 6,000 on a waiting list.

"Over the next six years, Wake Tech expects to grow by 50 percent,” President Stephen C. Scott said in a statement. “These facilities will help students get the classes they need to get the degrees they need to meet the county’s job market needs.”

 

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  • mswayze Aug 7, 2012

    Like with Easley- which /what /where get the $ contracts???

  • jdupree Aug 7, 2012

    Wake Teck already has two campuses, both very big. No real need for a third! Just a "want" not a "need". It's time to say no to some of this wasteful spending.

  • The Contractor Aug 7, 2012

    tuition has already been increasing almost every semester because the GOP wants us to pay more for our schooling.. summer classes arent subsidized by the state so tuition is almost as much as NC State tuition... its getting to the point where going to wake tech is about as expensive as a 4 yr college only you get screwed taking their non-accredited classes and not knowing about it...

  • dwntwnboy Aug 7, 2012

    Investing in education at all levels only helps us all in the long run.

  • whatelseisnew Aug 7, 2012

    As is usual I will vote no. Tuition and fees have to be raised to cover this. Wake County already carries far too much debt. It makes no sense to add to it. People need to wake up, the debt is on the taxpayer, not on something generically referred to as "A County" "A STATE" "A Federal Government". The collateral used for EVERY debt instrument is the future earnings of "Taxpayers". I define taxpayers as individual people and private companies. Voting yes essentially means you have borrowed against your future earnings and the future earnings of your kids if you have them. Maybe it is time for lenders to take into account that debt when they decide whether or not to issue you a car loan or a mortgage. Right now my county taxes are already too high and they need to be lower not higher.

  • Boycott_WRAL_Advertisers Aug 6, 2012

    LucaBrasi, I didn't say ALL classes, just a large percentage of them.

    Meaning.. in the past if enrollment went up 50% as President Scott mentioned, you would need a large increase in physical facilities.

    What he failed to include in his comments was the percentage of that increase would be taught online, so, it leaves the impression that facilities would have to increase more than they literally do in order to accommodate a 50% increase. [due to many of the classes being online now, and not onsite]

  • LucaBrasi Aug 6, 2012

    ..moving toward online calsses - markemails
    Really, can one take a car repair class online? How about a welding class? Get real; some classes require a hands on teaching environment.

  • Nancy Aug 6, 2012

    markemails, I do agree with you on the 'who you know' people getting the bids (which begs the question, how is the bid process REALLY handled).

  • Boycott_WRAL_Advertisers Aug 6, 2012

    One thing missing from the discussion is the move towards online classes. Enrollment may increase substantially, but a large percentage of that will be online students that may only rarely, if at all, attend classes on campus.

    I know someone taking 5 classes this Fall at Wake Tech and everyone of those 5 classes are online without any need to ever set foot on campus, including parking there.

  • Boycott_WRAL_Advertisers Aug 6, 2012

    Nancy, I certainly have, for many years. It's the percentage of the bond being spent on parking that's suspect. It's the amount going to parking and roadways. Does it really cost over 5 million dollars to pave a couple of acres? Can't we find someone in this economy that would do it for a lot less? Road building has been a racket in North Carolina for a VERY long time. Lots of cronyism, backdoor deals and payoffs.

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