Education

NC to release school test scores Thursday

Posted August 2, 2012

Education
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— The report cards are in for North Carolina's public schools. 

State school officials will release the annual ABCs of Public Education report at 10 a.m. on Thursday, which shows how students performed on end-of-grade and end-of-course tests taken in grades 3 through 12. Schools will be named as highest and lowest performers. 

The state will also release the Annual Measurable Objectives results, which will show how schools in the state performed on specific proficiency targets for each student subgroup. Thanks to a waiver issued by the United States Department of Education, the state will no longer report Adequate Yearly Progress results.

The "all or nothing standard" required by AYP rated overall performance on student reading and mathematics scores required by the No Child Left Behind law. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction June Atkinson said AMOs provide a clearer picture of how a school is performing.

In 2011, graduation rates rose to 77.7 percent, the highest four-year graduation rate ever reported in North Carolina.

Despite the increase, the number of schools meeting state and federal measures dropped last year from 88 percent in 2009-10 to 81.4 percent.

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  • for the people Aug 2, 2012

    I get that you don't want to pay for alternative schools so then what is your solution? plenty coups

    i didn't say that, i asked the question. i understand your position and honestly i don't know the solution to it. i do know we have a serious parenting problem in our society and it affects many aspects of our day to day lives, schools in this debate. other than putting more taxpayer money toward the problem, what other solutions are there?

  • Plenty Coups Aug 2, 2012

    'this puts the responsibility on the tax payer rather than the parents. the problem is the parents. i don't disagree with taking the discipline problems out of the general population but why should i have to pay for a parenting problem.'

    It just deals with reality. There's no use arguing over who's fault it is much like it would be useless to argue over why a criminal broke the law. But the issue I was responding to was about what to do with problem students who didn't want to be there and who were disrupting others. I get that you don't want to pay for alternative schools so then what is your solution?

  • Z Man Aug 2, 2012

    The process of grading the schools has become a career for many. Millions of potential teacher salary dollars is going to administrators. I guess if you can't teach then administrate. It's lucrative.

  • Constitutional Government Rocks Aug 2, 2012

    less is more said to unclejoeraleigh....I disagree with your statement that the best teachers is defined as getting more out of a student than expected..

    So how do you define the best teachers, getting less out of the students?

    Take a first grader who seems not to be paying attention and looking at the birds outside the window. A bad teacher says...Johnnie, pay attention how are you gonna learn to count? ...a good teacher teaches the kid to count the birds.

    My father was a Science teacher and principal in Charlotte for 30 plus years. He retired early because he could no longer hire teachers he wanted to hire,(Good Teachers) he had to hire based on factors other than being good, like skin color and such, not the content of their character and ability to teach.

  • for the people Aug 2, 2012

    I would be in favor of sending discipline problems to alternative schools. But right now we are underfunding this option.....plenty coups

    this puts the responsibility on the tax payer rather than the parents. the problem is the parents. i don't disagree with taking the discipline problems out of the general population but why should i have to pay for a parenting problem.

  • Plenty Coups Aug 2, 2012

    iprep-"I would argue that the 1/4 drop out rate could be avoided with a more proactive and diciplined approach... and yes... a boot camp style setting may be in order."

    I would be in favor of sending discipline problems to alternative schools. But right now we are underfunding this option. What exactly do you mean by more proactive? Boot camp isn't realistic.

  • casp3r Aug 2, 2012

    An elementary school in rainvill louisiana got a failing grade this last semester. They sent a letter home to the parents with two other schools that had passing grades that the could transfer their kids too.

    Only thing is, no white kids could transfer, only other students. No white ones can leave. Wow just wow..

    Huffington post has the story * I know wow there too :)

  • casp3r Aug 2, 2012

    A month or so ago, wral ran a story where whites will be the minority within so many years.

    Will test scores start to plument since there will be less white student to spread around the county?is this something we should prepare for? Is there anything we can do to prevent this?

  • gopack54 Aug 2, 2012

    Education has been dummied down to the lowest common denominator starting 40 years ago. Evidently they finally found the saturation point. Whoopee!

  • scuse2 Aug 2, 2012

    Gatsby....this is not with the new assignments....it is the old. Next year will be the new one.

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