Education

NCCU celebrates life of civil rights crusader Julius Chambers

Posted November 6, 2013

Julius Chambers

— North Carolina Central University celebrated the life of alumnus and civil rights attorney Julius Chambers on Wednesday.

The man known nationwide as a civil rights crusader died Aug. 2 in Charlotte at age 76. He served as chancellor at NCCU from 1993 to 2001.

"He's the single person who is most responsible for the NCCU you see today," said Rep. David Price, D-4th District. "He made a significant contribution as an educator. It's not what he's best known for, but it's indicative of what his values were."

Chambers is best known for taking eight cases to the Supreme Court and winning them all, including the 1971 case that led to integration of the schools in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County.

The case mandated crosstown busing and highlighted the power of federal courts to intervene when local public school systems hedged en route to full integration.

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  • AliceBToklas Nov 7, 2013

    What good does it do to celebrate these civil rights "leaders?" Anything that they may have done to advance their people has been undone already. They aren't even remembered by the majority of their own.
    --rsgolo

    You come across here as both hateful and hurtful. I certainly hope this is not true in your real life.

  • rsgolo Nov 7, 2013

    I'm ignorant? You know exactly who "his people" are, even if your political correctness (or your status as one of those people) prohibits you from acknowledging it. You say I'm ignorant? Okay, do this: walk up to one of "those people" walking down the street and ask them if they know who Julius Chambers was.

  • issymayake Nov 7, 2013

    I was able to attend part of the celebration for my dear fraternity brother and the chancellor during my tenure at NCCU. What a well-done service, officiated by Dr. Dudley Flood. Kudo's NCCU!

  • lets_b_real79 Nov 7, 2013

    Some of you are ignorant. You don't know the majority of "his people" so you have no idea. And even if they aren't "recognized" they still benefit from it. I know some white people that contributed but they are recognized either. That doesn't mean they didn't contribute in a great way.

  • rsgolo Nov 7, 2013

    What good does it do to celebrate these civil rights "leaders?" Anything that they may have done to advance their people has been undone already. They aren't even remembered by the majority of their own.

  • A person Nov 7, 2013

    And today NCCU produces things like Crystal Mangum and call her an "honors student" ridiculous