State News

NC's unemployment rate below national average for 2nd month

Posted September 20

— North Carolina's unemployment is better than the national average for the second month in a row, dropping in August to 4.6 percent.

The state Commerce Department reported Tuesday that the state's jobless rate fell from 4.7 percent in July while the national rate remained unchanged at 4.9 percent.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says North Carolina had one of the biggest improvements in unemployment rate in the country over the year, with the jobless rate falling from 5.7 percent.

More than 96,000 additional people have become employed in the past year.

But one commonly watched measure of blue-collar paychecks has not shown much improvement. The average hourly earnings of a manufacturing production worker in North Carolina increased by about one percent in the past year to $17.23.

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  • Jonas Feit Sep 21, 6:47 a.m.
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    Jack: I don't know a thing about the quality or duration of NC UI benefits relative to those of other states, but I do know how U3 and U6 are calculated. It's not necessary to drink any KoolAid; just read the definition. We're not talking about special or secret knowledge here.

  • Jack Reason Sep 21, 2:06 a.m.
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    The U-3 number which is reported only considers active claimants as unemployed. I think YOU have to stop being a Borg obfuscator and realize the first step to solving a problem is to stoptrying to sell the coolaid. Ackerman isn't enjoying any fantasies.

  • Jack Reason Sep 21, 1:59 a.m.
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    Not quite. Withcclaimants being dropped from the roles after 13 weeks, the number of unemployed (U-3 method) is vastly under-reported. NC's U-6 number may be over20%.NC has the worst, most useless UI benefits in the country. For what, so scrooge McPope and other greedy sli me have yet another pile of money they can't count?

  • Jonas Feit Sep 20, 6:21 p.m.
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    This is, of course, incorrect. All states are 'graded on the same scale,' as, if this were not the case, it would be pointless to produce state-level statistics.

    Anyone more interested in how the unemployed are actually counted, rather than in Mr Ackerman's fantasy should look here: http://www.bls.gov/cps/cps_htgm.htm#unemployed

  • Marilyn Loftin Sep 20, 6:20 p.m.
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    You can thank our wonderful Governor!

  • Ken Ackerman Sep 20, 5:39 p.m.
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    The numbers for NC look better because NC gets graded on a different scale than other states. If an unemployed person is not receiving benefits, he/she is not counted as unemployed. In benefits last for 13 weeks I think, in other states they last for 52 weeks.

  • Aiden Audric Sep 20, 2:56 p.m.
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    "But one commonly watched measure of blue-collar paychecks has not shown much improvement. The average hourly earnings of a manufacturing production worker in North Carolina increased by about one percent in the past year to $17.23."

    Politically, how can McCrory take credit for lower unemployment while taking credit for stagnant wages? He ran for the rural vote but isn't doing much to help them have clean water or good paying jobs.

    Should be interesting.