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McCrory signs bill approving ramp meters, campus improvements

Posted July 7, 2014
Updated July 8, 2014

The North Carolina Department of Transportation is looking into the installation of ramp meters, which are signals along interstate ramps that control merging traffic.

— Gov. Pat McCrory on Monday signed a bill authorizing, among a variety of things, interstate ramp meters – simple stoplights installed on high-volume on-ramps used to space traffic flowing onto interstates at rush hour.

The Department of Transportation already has the authority to install ramp meters, but under current law, running a red light on a meter would have been treated the same as running a regular red light, subject to a ticket and insurance points. Anticipating a public outcry, the agency postponed use of the meters.

The bill clarifies that running a ramp meter is an infraction, which doesn't carry points or an insurance surcharge.

The measure also authorizes six University of North Carolina system schools to spend a total of $376 million of non-state funds for improvements:

  • $156 million for improving the Student Union Building, the Health Sciences Campus Student Services Building and a new parking structure at East Carolina University.
  • $129 million for a new residence hall, the renovation of four residence halls and building various infrastructure at UNC-Charlotte.
  • A $35 million facelift to Reynolds Coliseum at North Carolina State University.
  • $32 million in upgrades for the Manning Drive Chilled Water Plant at UNC-Chapel Hill.
  • $22.5 million to renovate the Brown Building at Western Carolina University.
  • $1 million for improvements at the Student Recreation Center and the Karl Straus Track Building at UNC-Asheville.

The money isn't part of the state budget, and the campuses will pay for the projects by student fees, private donations and other means. Even though no state money is involved, the UNC system is required to seek legislative approval for any capital project over a specified amount.

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  • Clayton Mack Jul 8, 2014

    That last part was in the update. There was no mention of the source of funding in the original article. I had to read another station's report to get that helpful tidbit of information.

  • pinehorse Jul 8, 2014

    And the budget is...

  • goldenosprey Jul 8, 2014

    Ramp meters?! Drivers in NC can't even figure out the turn signal thingie sticking off the steering column. I'm afraid this will create a state of pandemonium, especially in places like Wilmington where no one can halfway drive to begin with.

  • madamwuf Jul 8, 2014

    View quoted thread



    It IS most likely coming out of the athletic budget. Read the article again. The schools are only getting approval to spend their own money, such as their own student fees (such as the athletic fee for athletic capital projects) and private donations.

  • madamwuf Jul 8, 2014

    View quoted thread



    No. Read the article again. All the way to the bottom this time.

    "The money isn't part of the state budget, and the campuses will pay for the projects by student fees, private donations and other means. Even though no state money is involved, the UNC system is required to seek legislative approval for any capital project over a specified amount."

    None of these schools are getting state budget assistance for their projects. They just have to get approval for projects they are planning independently. Nobody is getting a dime from the state.

  • doser Jul 8, 2014

    $35 Million for Reynolds you cannot tell me there was not a better place to spend this money. For example raises for teachers!

    If they want to upgrade athletic facilities let it come out of their athletic budget.

  • doser Jul 8, 2014

    $35 Million for Reynolds you cannot tell me there was not a better place to spend this money. For example raises for teachers!

    If they want to upgrade athletic facilities let it come out of their athletic budget.

  • Clayton Mack Jul 8, 2014

    View quoted thread


    I was going to say the same thing. They need more effective lobbyists/representatives to speak for us.

  • gmuny33 Jul 8, 2014

    Not surprising, that not one HBCU get a dime for improvements, and most of them need it more. Congrats to the schools that will receive the assistance.