@NCCapitol

@NCCapitol

McCrory's bid to shift lottery funds no game-changer for schools

Posted February 20, 2013

— Gov. Pat McCrory's call to change how state lottery money is allocated won't have a measurable impact on North Carolina schools, observers said Wednesday.

In his State of the State address on Monday, McCrory called for legislation "to reallocate a portion of money away from the bloated, and frankly annoying, advertising and the large administrative costs of the lottery commission." He said the money could be better used to upgrade classroom technology statewide.

North Carolina Education Lottery officials counter that administrative costs are already half what state law allows. Also, the lottery spent $14.7 million to advertise its games in the fiscal year that ended last June, which officials said is less per capita than comparable states.

"Our fear would be that, if we were required to reduce ads, that it would reduce sales and money for education," lottery spokesman Van Denton said.

Ads and sales generally go hand in hand, Denton said.

Rep. Paul Stam, R-Wake, said he not only wants less spent on lottery ads, he wants the games portrayed in a less appealing way.

"Almost all of their advertising is false and deceptive," Stam said.

Lottery tickets Lottery officials: Fewer ads could mean lower sales

Beyond commercials, McCrory also hopes to change how lottery proceeds are spent. The $2.6 billion the lottery has raised for education since its inception is restricted to upgrading teacher pay, school construction, pre-kindergarten programs and college scholarships.

"There's a pot of money right now that can only be used on certain things. Why not let all of our districts use that money on technology and virtual learning?" the governor said during his State of the State address.

Companion bills were filed Wednesday in the House and Senate that would permit school districts to use lottery money for digital textbooks, school connectivity and other technology, as well as staff training to use the devices, until June 2016. After that, a district would need to demonstrate that the technology boosted student learning and receive State Board of Education permission to continue spending lottery money on new devices, according to House Bill 97 and Senate Bill 119.

"I'd like to give every dollar we give unrestricted, and let them make their money go as far as it will where they know it needs to go," said Sen. Jerry Tillman, R-Randolph.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction June Atkinson said she also wanted more funding for school technology, but she pointed out that the lottery generates only 4 percent of North Carolina's total budget for public schools.

"That amount of money would be just a drop in the bucket for the amount of money we really need," Atkinson said.

133 Comments

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  • stubbo19992 Feb 22, 1:29 a.m.

    These people don't care if a child is in school or not. They got their education, so why should they be worried if a child gets their education that they need to survive this hell on earth? I'm so tired of hearing about The Board Of Education of Wake County is having a meeting and cutting BUDGETS. If they are having such a hard time with having teachers,classroom needs,more space and buses; Why don't they go ahead and do what they really want to do? Close all schools and that way money can be put where their mouth is.

  • Plenty Coups Feb 21, 6:49 p.m.

    Nancy-"There is no competition for the lottery, people know it's out there."

    Of course there's competition, the lottery is competing with many other ventures that want to take people's disposable income. When people are aware that there are big lottery prizes or new games, sales increase dramatically.

  • 4Strikes Feb 21, 2:52 p.m.

    "Based on what data? Do you have any proof the advertising brought in the revenue? No." Nancy

    Exactly...Fools are going to line up to throw their money away, ads or no ads. Stop annoying the rest of us with it.

  • glarg Feb 21, 2:34 p.m.

    "North Carolina Education Lottery officials counter that administrative costs are already half what state law allows. Also, the lottery spent $14.7 million to advertise its games in the fiscal year that ended last June, which officials said is less per capita than comparable states."

    Typical bureaucrat!

    Notice how his objections are moot: "we are allowed by law to waste more", "we waste less than other states".

    Its not your money- you shouldnt be wasting any of it!

  • Nancy Feb 21, 2:28 p.m.

    "The ad budget for the Lottery actually looks rather small, given the amounts it brings in."

    Based on what data? Do you have any proof the advertising brought in the revenue? No.

  • Grand Union Feb 21, 1:59 p.m.

    "what damage would that be? Grand Union

    They lost, that should tell you right there people were not pleased with what they were doing."

    Answer the question. What damage?

    " No specific examples are necessary."

    Yes they are, you made a claim and now back it up.

    " But if you want examples of liberal failure look no further than Detroit. Not even the libbiest of libs can spin or make enough excuses to cover or deflect what democrats did to that once great city, it used to be called "The Paris of the West!" I grew up there I saw first hand how corrupt democrats turned that city into a toilet."

    and you don't think the decline of the auto industry was perhaps a much bigger factor?

  • Grand Union Feb 21, 1:53 p.m.

    "Just like some are anti-anything-Obama, I suspect some are already anti-anything-McCrory and that's why the outcry of spending less advertising the lottery."

    Nope I make the call on the merits of the issue. The ad budget for the Lottery actually looks rather small, given the amounts it brings in. Perhaps this is just a precursor to the GOP finding an excuse to sell the lottery off to one of his cronies?

  • Grand Union Feb 21, 1:50 p.m.

    "
    "Look at the leadership of the past five years and the democratic policies that started the financial mess. Those very stupid people that I mentioned earlier are the ones that all bought houses that they couldn't afford. The federal government forced banks to lend to them in the interest of "fairness". Then they had to turn around and bail out the banks." 45'Strikes"

    Lol no thats not even remotely what happened.....once wall street started buying every mortgage the banks could make the banks stopped caring who they lent money too.

  • djofraleigh Feb 21, 1:31 p.m.

    Just like some are anti-anything-Obama, I suspect some are already anti-anything-McCrory and that's why the outcry of spending less advertising the lottery.

  • shaun2xlife Feb 21, 1:28 p.m.

    The federal government forced banks to lend to them in the interest of "fairness". 4Strikes

    Please do some research on where the housing bubble transpired, Hint it's not the low income households. Started in affluent neighborhoods, and banks were the unethical party as they were not forced to give loans but also couldn't take local areas money (community banks) & loan to the communities down in the richer neighborhoods & continue to look pass the people who invested in these banks. Review the facts everything is not some government conspiracy.

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