@NCCapitol

@NCCapitol

McCrory talks winter storm, avoids climate change on 'Face the Nation'

Posted February 16

— Appearing on CBS News' "Face the Nation" Sunday to talk about the winter storm that shut down the state last week, Gov. Pat McCrory sidestepped a pointed question about his position on climate change. 

The question from host Bob Schieffer came at the end of a segment on North Carolina's response to the storm. 

"Governor, a couple of years ago, you made a remark that caught a lot of people's attention. You said that global warming is 'in God's hands,'" Schieffer said. "After what you've - going through this thing, do you still feel that way? Is there something we ought to be doing about it in the meantime?"

"I think someone took a chop off the total sentence there," McCrory responded. "I will say this: I feel that there's always been climate change. The debate is, really, how much of it is man-made and how much will it cost to have any impact on climate change.

"My main argument is, let's clean up the environment, and as mayor and now as governor, I'm spending my time cleaning our air, cleaning our water, cleaning the ground," he continued. "I think that's where the argument should be on both the left and the right, and if that has an impact on climate change, good. But I think that's where the real argument should be, is doing what we can to clean up our environment.

"We also have to look for cost-effective ways to do it because, as governor, we're walking that fine line of keeping our environment clean but also continuing economic recovery and making sure things like power are affordable for the consumer," the governor concluded.

Schieffer did not ask about the state's other big recent story, the Dan River coal ash spill, or about the federal investigation of it launched last week. Both McCrory's administration and his longtime former employer, Duke Energy, have received subpoenas for documentation or communications pertaining to that coal ash pond.

Officials with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources are expected to field questions about the coal ash spill at a Monday meeting of the state's Environmental Review Commission.

Out of context? 

The quote Schieffer was referring to was accurate in context. It came during an interview McCrory did with Hickory talk-radio WHKY in April 2008, during his first campaign for governor. The host asked McCrory about "his stance on global warming" and what he would do about it as governor. 

"I believe in cleaning the environment," McCrory responded at the time. "I don't get caught up in the 'global warming' debate because I frankly think some things are out of our hands. It's in God's hands, and frankly, the world has been warming for a long time."

205 Comments

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  • undefeated Feb 16, 12:39 p.m.

    So, the governor believes in God, when there is absolutely no proof, but not so much global warming where the majority of scientists believe is happening. Okay. Belief in God hurts no one and is probably a big help. Denying the scientific facts on global warming could hurt us all.
    Very interested to see the results of the federal EPA investigation into the coal ash dump by the governor's former employer Duke. Didn't Duke have another spill right when the governor came into "power"? Maybe someone could answer that question. And if they did have an earlier spill, what were the consequences?

  • tarheelbowman Feb 16, 12:49 p.m.

    What was Bev Purdue's position on global warming or Mike Easley's or Jim Hunt's?

  • davidgnews Feb 16, 12:50 p.m.

    What a doofus of a governor.

  • IceCreamMan Feb 16, 1:00 p.m.

    How is that a 'sidestep'? "I will say this: I feel that there's always been climate change. The debate is, really, how much of it is man-made and how much will it cost to have any impact on climate change." - that pretty much nails the entire issue.

  • DurhamDevil Feb 16, 1:12 p.m.

    To equate a single weather event with climate change is not only nonsense, its not even good science. Snow in NC is not by any means a rare event.

    I like McCrory's response to Schieffer and I am ready to cast my vote for the re-election of our governor.

  • scubagirl2 Feb 16, 1:42 p.m.

    well OF COURSE he avoided it. His benefactor-Duke Energy has warned him off speaking of that-might then downgrade to talk of the DE/PE merger, the DE coal ash spills and other topics DE doesn't want to be put in public

  • scubagirl2 Feb 16, 1:47 p.m.

    "Governor, a couple of years ago, you made a remark that caught a lot of people's attention. You said that global warming is 'in God's hands,'" Schieffer said. "After what you've - going through this thing, do you still feel that way? Is there something we ought to be doing about it in the meantime?"

    "I think someone took a chop off the total sentence there," McCrory responded. "I will say this: I feel that there's always been climate change. The debate is, really, how much of it is man-made and how much will it cost to have any impact on climate change."

    and people VOTED for this....smh

  • Gork Feb 16, 1:56 p.m.

    So he lied today - and he's very concerned about cleaning up our water, as long as it doesn't impact Duke or Art's bottom lines...

  • bcandjc Feb 16, 2:16 p.m.

    Amazing! When people need sympathy individuals say they will pray for you, who do they pray to if not God. If He is in control of prayer, He is in control of everything, whether one agrees or likes it.

  • buffalobrc Feb 16, 2:31 p.m.

    I don't see that the governor side-stepped anything but an intentional trap. If you read closely, McCrory's statements from both interviews were very consistent. Both times, he recognized global warming as a fact and stated what we need to be doing to clean up the environment. But he's also smart enough to recognize he can't "get caught up in the global warming debate", by taking extreme costly measures that will likely have little total impact toward remedying the global situation. He seems to be advocating taking prudent measures needed now to protect and improve the environment, without bankrupting the state. I appreciate his approach, versus foolishly spending taxpayer dollars to earn points on some agency's vision of "green" (such as US Green Building Council's LEED Gold or Platinum rating).

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