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McCrory ad on HB2: 'Are we really talking about this?'

Posted September 7

This is a still image from Gov. Pat McCrory's "Common Sense" ad, which references HB2.

— Gov. Pat McCrory's campaign rolled out a new ad Wednesday dismissing the controversy over House Bill 2.

"You know, when we were raising average teacher pay, creating new jobs and cutting taxes, other folks were actually pushing to make our schools allow boys to use the girls' locker rooms and showers," McCrory says in the ad, during which he addresses the camera directly. "Are we really talking about this? Does the desire to be politically correct outweigh our children's privacy and safety? Not on my watch. Our kids and teachers are my priority. This is North Carolina. Let's do what's right."

The controversy over whether transgender individuals can use the bathroom of their choice in government-owned buildings reaches back to March, when lawmakers held a special session over the matter. The bill that emerged, which McCrory signed hours after it was passed, has been the focus of controversy and several federal lawsuits that aren't expected to be heard in court until next year.

Although McCrory, a Republican, doesn't reference his opponent in the ad, he does critique in an accompanying email Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper's refusal to defend the law in court.

"For months, Roy Cooper has pushed a false narrative about the state's privacy and protection law to divert attention away from his support for an extreme agenda that's out of step with North Carolina beliefs and values," Russell Peck, McCrory's campaign manager, said in the email. "Roy Cooper supports policies that allow boys and even grown men to use a girl's locker room or shower facility."

It's also fair to note that the McCrory campaign insists this spot is about more than HB2 itself.

"This is clearly a larger issue now that half of all states are fighting the left's extreme agenda being pushed here by Roy Cooper and his allies," McCrory spokesman Ricky Diaz said in an email.

However, this is McCrory's second ad of the campaign referencing House Bill 2, and it's hard to imagine it being such a salient issue in the campaign if McCrory hadn't signed the bill and so vigorously defended it. 

And as Cooper's campaign was quick to point out Wednesday, comes a week after{{/a}} McCrory dismissed the law as "irrelevant" on a local political talk show, citing recent actions by the Obama administration and surmising that it would be an issue for the U.S. Supreme Court to sort out.

"How can we fix this problem if we have a governor who won’t even acknowledge it exists?" Cooper campaign spokesman Jamal Little said in a news release. "While the Governor continues to deny the economic impact of House Bill 2, by running this ad it’s clear he recognizes the impact it is having on his poll numbers. It’s time for a leader who will work to repeal House Bill 2 and put the interests of North Carolinians first."

34 Comments

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  • Amy Whaley Sep 9, 6:33 p.m.
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    I think you totally miss the point of the objectors. Most people aren't afraid of transgenders and know that they have used the restroom with them. What the Charlotte ordinance did was give pedophiles (usually white males) unfettered access to his victims by simply claiming that he is transgender. There in lies the problem.

  • Amy Whaley Sep 9, 6:23 p.m.
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    Sam, go back and check the stories when they broke. HB2 was a direct response to the Charlotte ordinance. Transgenders weren't complaining because as so many have pointed out... they use the restroom they identify with and no one really knows the difference.

  • Rachel Schoonover Sep 9, 11:03 a.m.
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    If you honestly believe that you've never used a public bathroom with a transgendered person you are part of the problem in this state. If someone wants to cause people in the bathroom harm, do you honestly believe that little sign saying male or female makes a difference? This was an unnecessary part of a more discriminatory law. Why we're not talking about the rest of it and only focusing on where people pee is really and truly sad. If you're afraid a male living as a woman may be in the stall next to you, then use your private bathroom at your house before you leave. And to the GA stop saying this is to protect women and children. I'm not afraid of transgender people in the bathroom. I'm more afraid of the garbage y'all seem to find important and the junk y'all are passing these days. Get back to the business of running the state and doing what you were elected to do. Stop worrying about what people do in their private lives.

  • Sam Nada Sep 9, 8:52 a.m.
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    Nonsense. If the NCGA hadn't passed HB2 we wouldn't be talking about it. Blaming Charlotte is just another nutso deflection of where the real responsibility lies. There's no evidence that anyone has been endangered by the 100's of bathroom laws around the country, and no reason to believe Charlotte would be the exception. Why was there no debate or public discussion of HB2? Because it couldn't stand the test of rational scrutiny, and because the GOP wanted to sneak in other provisions that were much more important to them under the cover of the false pretense of protecting women and children. No one with an ounce of sense can fail to see through this absurdity. The right wingers aren't high on subtlety, any more than they could hide the racism in their voter ID laws and illegal gerrymandering. They're playing to the ignorant and the fearful, because that's their base, in order to serve the interests of the wealthy. Time to evict them.

  • Amy Whaley Sep 8, 10:40 p.m.
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    Of course it is, however, it had to be defined because of the Charlotte ordinance that was forcing all businesses private and government, i.e. your local gym, pool house, camp grounds, etc to allow men who claimed to feel like a woman to use the women facilities. With the Charlotte ordinance, it would be real easy for the heterosexual, old, white man pedophile to follow his victim into the locker room and not be stopped because he can claim he "identifies" as a female. If the Charlotte City council hadn't passed such a ridiculous ordinance, we wouldn't be discussing HB2.

  • Amy Whaley Sep 8, 10:33 p.m.
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    So says you Sam.

  • Pete Muller Sep 8, 2:16 p.m.
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    Mr. Chen. Your claim that the SBI crime was taken away from Cooper because of poor management is false. Just because the RGA wants it, doesn't make it so. Move out of your fact free environment.

  • Betsy Sparks Sep 8, 10:19 a.m.
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    HB2 is an unenforceable law. There is no way to prove someone is violating the law, and there is no guidance on what to do if someone violates the law. It's a poor piece of legislation. That's what McCrory needs to understand. There are plenty of voters who want our elected officials to focus their time and money on legislation that actually accomplishes something.

  • Sam Nada Sep 8, 8:28 a.m.
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    Equal protection under the law for every citizen isn't "PC BS". It's one of the foundations of our society. If you think the objections to HB2 are merely PC and BS, you haven't read the law or understood why so many have such strong objections to it. But HB2 isn't the only reason not to vote for McCrory, it's just one in a long list.

  • Mary Meadows Sep 7, 11:17 p.m.
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    As a registered Democrst I can sum up my viewpoint on this very concisely : I will vote for McCrory at election time. I'm so sick of the PC BS.

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