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Mayberry Days celebrates 'The Andy Griffith Show' this weekend

Posted September 24, 2014

Mayberry Days, a festival celebrating the anniversary of "The Andy Griffith Show," starts Thursday in downtown Mount Airy. 

Events kick off Thursday morning with a golf tournament at Cross Creek Country Club and continue through Sunday. 

There are so many events happening there throughout the weekend. Here are a few highlights: 

  • Thursday 8 p.m. - Beach music from The Embers at Blackmon Amphitheatre. Tickets are $15
  • Friday 12:30 p.m. - Don Knotts' daughter, Karen, brings her one-woman show, "Tied Up in Knotts," to the Earle Theatre. Reserved and balcony seats are $15 each. 
  • Friday 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Snappy Lunch in downtown Mount Airy is hosting a pork chop sandwich eating contest. The record is eight sandwiches. Only those 18 years and older can enter.
  • Friday 2:30 p.m. - Pie eating contest in front of the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Register at the Information Station before 2 p.m. Friday to compete. There is a $1 entry fee.
  • Friday 4:30 p.m. - Mayberry Days "The Andy Griffith Show" Trivia contest will take place at Blackmon Amphitheatre. To compete, purchase a $2 Trivia Fan at the Information Station in front of the Andy Griffith Playhouse or at the Amphitheatre right before the contest.
  • Friday 4:15 p.m. - James Best, known for playing Jim Lindsey on "The Andy Griffith Show" and Rosco P. Coletrane on the "Dukes of Hazzard," shares his favorite clips from TV and film during a family-friendly show. Tickets are $15. 
  • Friday 2 p.m. - The Doug Dillard Tribute Concert featuring Rodney Dillard and the Dillard Band play the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Dillard was one of the original Darling Boys from "The Andy Griffith Show." Reserved seats are $25.
  • Friday 9:30 p.m. - The VW Boys bring their blend of comedy, magic and music to the Earle Theatre with their "Salute to Mayberry." Reserved and balcony tickets are $10.
  • Saturday 9 a.m. - The Mayberry Day's parade goes down Main Street from Independence Boulevard to the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Some of the best viewing is supposed to be on the north end of Main Street. 
  • Saturday 10 a.m. - noon - Silent auction at the Andy Griffith Playhouse featuring unique Mayberry items, including autographed memorabilia. 
  • Saturday 12:30 p.m. - The Mayberry "Idle" talent competition will be held at Blackmon Amphihteatre. Winners get to perform at Colonel Tim's Matinee and Evening show. Sign up begins at 8 a.m. Friday and continues at 8 a.m. Saturday at the Information Station in front of the Andy Griffith Playhouse. 
  • Sunday 9:30 a.m. - Colonel Tim's Matinee will feature a variety of talent including stand-up comic John Floyd, "The Mouth of Mayberry." Reserved seats are $25. (Note: There is an evening show, but that is sold out.)

There are many more events that we couldn't even list here. Many are free! For a full rundown, go to the Mayberry Days website. 

16 Comments

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  • Erica Allison-Mayberry Sep 25, 2014
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    --Ha! Ha! How 'bout my last name IS Mayberry!!! :D

  • Lightfoot3 Sep 25, 2014

    "Lynchings are a brutal form of murder, a form of terrorism actually, and they degrade not only their victims but their perpetrators. They are not in the least funny as LIGHTFOOT3 seems to believe from his or her tasteless comment" - sinenomine


    That would be HIS tasteless comment. But not only was it tasteless, it was also humorous and sarcastic. :)

  • sinenomine Sep 25, 2014

    Lynchings are a brutal form of murder, a form of terrorism actually, and they degrade not only their victims but their perpetrators. They are not in the least funny as LIGHTFOOT3 seems to believe from his or her tasteless comment.

  • Lightfoot3 Sep 25, 2014

    "I lived in the rural South in 1960 and never saw, or heard of, anything like you describe. Perhaps you are confused." - justabumer


    You mean you don't remember the Friday night lynching festivals that every Southern town celebrated? It was so common, how could you forget it? Ahhh, the memories and fun times.

  • sinenomine Sep 25, 2014

    Lynching was a fact of life in the South until well within living memory. Statistics are widely available for anyone willing to look them up. My late grandmother, who lived for a while as a child in Huntsville, Alabama shortly after the turn of the 20th century, recalled the noise of a lynch mob near her home one night and remembered seeing a black man's corpse swinging from a tree near the courthouse the following morning on the way to school.

    "The Andy Griffith Show" is not and was never intended to be reality. It's a SITCOM. It was extremely popular when it was in production and to judge from the success of Mayberry Days still has a large following. To apply current notions of political correctness to it after fifty years, and with most of its cast dead, is inane.

  • justabumer Sep 25, 2014

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    I lived in the rural South in 1960 and never saw, or heard of, anything like you describe. Perhaps you are confused.

  • Ishitonthewralcorncobdesk Sep 25, 2014

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    If there had been any real black characters in this show, they would have been hanging by a noose by the end of the episode. This was the rural south in 1960.

  • sinenomine Sep 25, 2014

    From 1951 to 1953 CBS TV aired Amos 'n' Andy. It featured an almost entirely African-American cast. Supporting roles, virtually all portrayed by black talent, included all kinds of professionals including among others doctors, lawyers, judges, business owners, and realtors, Although the show was a sitcom the supporting roles were usually not played for laughs but were serious background to the antics of the lead characters.

    In that day and age about the only jobs routinely available to black talent on TV were stints as maids.

    There was no hint of racism on Amos 'n' Andy. When white characters appeared they were invariably respectful to black characters. There was never a hint of a racial slur.

    The NAACP, for reasons beyond me, despised the program from the gitgo and it went out of production after only two years.

    Diversity in racial terms on TV has improved little if at all since then.

    Please, if you haven't seen the program you are unqualified to intelligently comment on it.

  • iopsyc Sep 25, 2014

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    If it's anything like the TV series yes, there will be black people (although they may not have any speaking roles).

  • Lightfoot3 Sep 25, 2014

    "I wonder if any black people will be there." - Anita Woody


    The show was in black and white for years.

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