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Study looks at fish oil in treating Alzheimer’s

Posted November 2, 2010

A new study examined if DHA, a key ingredient found in fish oil, could be a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

The study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association looks at the real value of DHA in slowing the rate of a patient’s mental decline.

Fish oil component tested for Alzheimer's treatment Fish oil component tested for Alzheimer's treatment

A number of studies have shown the substance, a key ingredient in fish oil, is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients brains.

Researchers at Oregon Health and Science University looked at 402 Alzheimer’s patients over an 18-month period, giving one group DHA and a second a placebo.

“It turns out that this substance did not slow the rate of progression in people who already had a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Joseph F. Quinn.

There was no evidence that the DHA had any adverse effects on the participants in the trial.

Researchers measured a number of factors, including mental function.

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  • Baybee Doll Nov 3, 2010

    There's something fishy about this story....

  • jervin6 Nov 3, 2010

    I do not agree that a study based on treating Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) "ie smacking a rat in the head hard enough to cause brain damage" with etanercept as evidence this anti-inflammatory drug will improve cognition in AD. Treating an acute condition of brain injury or trauma is very different than one that gradually overtakes the brain over ten or more years. I do however agree further funding from NIH to investigate all areas of AD is really needed.

  • nrimed Nov 2, 2010

    On a positive note, an exciting new study adds to the increasing evidence that special anti-inflammatory therapeutics may improve cognition in a variety of brain disorders including Alzheimer’s. See http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20796174 and http://nrimed.com/pub.html Together these findings suggest that continued investigation of inflammation as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease is urgently needed.