National News

Judaculla Rock offers possible glimpse at centuries-old solar eclipse

Posted August 17

— Thanks to modern science, humans know exactly when, where, and why a solar eclipse is happening.

But to the Cherokee hundreds of years ago, a solar eclipse was a world-changing event.

CHEROKEE, N.C. (WLOS) - Thanks to modern science, humans know exactly when, where, and why a solar eclipse is happening.

But to the Cherokee hundreds of years ago, a solar eclipse was a world-changing event.

Brett Riggs, a professor of Cherokee studies at Western Carolina University, said it's possible a depiction of a solar eclipse was carved into Judaculla Rock in Jackson County.

Riggs said one of the largest pits in the sacred rock resembles the sun during an eclipse, with lines of light out around its circumference.

"The upper portion of rock really jives with traditional Native concepts of the way the universe is structured," Riggs added.

He said much of Judaculla Rock is a Cherokee depiction of the nighttime sky and what we now call constellations.

Comments

Please with your WRAL.com account to comment on this story. You also will need a Facebook account to comment.

Oldest First
View all