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@NCCapitol

Hundreds rally in Raleigh for voting rights

Posted September 3, 2015

— Hundreds of people marched through downtown Raleigh on Thursday evening and rallied near the State Capitol in support of voting rights.

The demonstration is part of the NAACP's Journey for Justice march, which began Aug. 1 in Selma, Ala., and is expected to conclude later this month with a rally in Washington, D.C. The 860-mile trek has focused on issues from improving schools to economic growth to criminal justice reform, but in North Carolina, it has centered on voting rights.

“I am here for justice, for the right to vote,” said demonstrator Mary Perry. “I fought in the ‘50s and ‘60s. I’m tired of fighting, but I’ll fight on.”

State lawmakers enacted sweeping election law changes two years ago, such as eliminating same-day registration, shortening early voting and, beginning next year, requiring voters to present photo identification at the polls. Portions of the law are being challenged in both state and federal courts.

The legislation came shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court threw out part of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965, saying it was based on old data.

"Legislatures, especially in the South, have engaged in all out assault against voting rights because Congress has not acted to fix the Voting Rights Act," Rev. William Barber, president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, said in a statement. "As a result, North Carolina has seen the worst attack on voting rights since the days of the first Jim Crow in the 1800s."

Demonstrators marched from Shaw University along Davie and Fayetteville streets to Bicentennial Plaza, between the Capitol and the Legislative Building, chanting for justice and carrying signs in support of voting rights.

"We believe that the Voting Rights Act is vital American treasure which has to be preserved and protected," national NAACP President Cornell Brooks said as he marched. "The right to vote is a civic sacrament. The voting booth is our altar. We cannot allow the right to vote to be desecrated. We cannot allow the right to vote to be taken away."

Kara Carter, a spokeswoman for the North Carolina Republican Party, said the NAACP's concerns are misplaced.

"The truth is their opposition to North Carolina's voting law isn't about race or justice. Even after the law was enacted, African-American voter turnout increased in 2014," Carter said in a statement.

36 Comments

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  • Arron Lee Sep 9, 2015
    user avatar

    So tired of this "non-issue." If you are over 18 years of age in this country, you have the right to vote. Simple!!! To Mary Perry, you say you fought in the 50's and 60's, just what did you fight for? You now have the right to vote, what else do you feel entitled too?

  • Mick Flynn Sep 5, 2015
    user avatar

    If they have time to march from Alabama to DC I would think they have time to get an ID. Although I suspect there really aren't any that don't already have an ID.

  • Mike Morgan Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    When they used to poll the question, showing an ID to vote was always favored by over 75% of registered voters. Funny how they don't show those polls anymore ...

  • Mike Morgan Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    And for how many hundreds of years was it only 1 day?

    Like the joke goes: My grandfather voted Republican his whole life. but the last few years he's been voting Democrat. Since he died, that is...

  • David Pilley Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread



    What a terrible affliction you must suffer, having money!

  • Dean Logan Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    Did they check their IDs before they got on the SEIO buses?

  • John Lobenstein Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    Hey people you have 14 months to get registered before the 2016 elections. You have those same 14 months to obtain an approved ID before the 2016 elections. If you refuse to do either because your feelings are tweaked then not being able to vote is your fault and yours alone.

    The false flag of not having time to vote is just a convenient excuse. Federal law requires that your employer allow you to time off to vote.

    What would you have done before the advent of early voting?

  • John Lobenstein Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    Will holding parades and marching up and down the side walks get these people registered? Use these same resources to get potential voters registered.

    Why not demonstrate that your garden does not have any tomatoes when you have an unopened package of seeds on your desk or counter top?

  • Tom Boswell Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    I am against voter suppression. I am sick of suppression. All of this suppression happened to be in less than 24 hours. Going on vacation I had to go to the bank to cash a check and you will never believe what happen, bank suppression they asked for an ID to cash MY check. I left there to go to the pharmacy to get a prescription and guess again, you got it Pharmacy suppression. From there I went to UPS to pick up a missed package I needed for my trip and OMG it happened again parcel pickup suppression. They had the audacity to ask for my ID. Heading to the airport feeling abused you will never have guessed what came next, TSA suppression. Did it stop there oh no. Getting to my destination, I needed to rent a car and yep Avis suppression. Eight hours, five suppression’s.

  • Carl Keehn Sep 4, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    I'm sorry but according to the Supreme Court, that is not correct. In 1979, Symm vs The United States has extended the right of students to vote where they attend school.

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