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Harvey Korman and bad movies highlight this week's TV shows on DVD

Posted August 9

Harvey Korman is showcased on “Carol Burnett Show” episodes, and “Cinema Titanic,” the “MST3K” follow-up, lead these TV shows on DVD.

“The Carol Burnett Show: The Best of Harvey Korman” (Time Life, 1968-71, four episodes). Three of the four shows here have never before been released on video, and all were chosen to highlight Burnett’s second banana, Harvey Korman, who has some hilarious material ranging from elaborately dressing in drag for an Andrews Sisters spoof to cracking up opposite Tim Conway’s old man routine. Other guests include Sid Caesar, Diahann Carroll, Ella Fitzgerald, Bernadette Peters and Nancy Wilson. One episode, the final show of the first season, has no guest stars but instead allows each of the regular cast members to shine with skits and songs.

“Cinematic Titanic: The Complete Collection” (Shout!, 2007-12, six discs, 12 episodes, featurettes). “Mystery Science Theater 3000” creator Joel Hodgson and four other “MST3K” veterans collaborated for this similar program, with comics riffing on bad movies as they play on a screen above them. Some of these were performed live in theater settings. Among the titles lampooned are “The Wasp Woman” (1959), “Blood of the Vampires” (1966), “Frankenstein’s Castle of Freaks” (1974) and one that was also on “MST3K,” “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians” (1964).

“Remember Me” (PBS, 2014, three episodes). Michael Palin, the Monty Python veteran who has lately been making travel documentaries for British television, takes the lead role in this supernatural mystery as an elderly man who fakes an accident to get into a care facility. But he actually just wants to leave his home, which is haunted. Of course, his move solves nothing. It is offbeat and slow, with some ambiguous elements, but patient viewers should find it worthwhile.

“Blindspot: The Complete Second Season” (Warner, 2017, four Blu-ray discs/five DVD discs, 22 episodes, deleted scenes, featurettes). The premise here has an amnesiac Jane Doe (Jamie Alexander) found naked and covered in cryptic tattoos that have sinister meanings. More secrets and lies dominate the second season, as she escapes from CIA custody and finds herself recruited by the FBI to take down the shadowy Sandstorm organization.

“Big Little Lies” (HBO, 2017, three discs, seven episodes, featurettes). In Monterey, California, highly competitive and very wealthy women (led by Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman and Shailene Woodley) rule the roost, but there’s a class system, and everyone has secrets and double lives, and betrayals come all too easily. This HBO miniseries is a very dark suburban satire that’s part soap opera and part murder mystery. It may well bring to mind “Desperate Housewives” — but with graphic sex, nudity and language (hey, it’s HBO). Laura Dern and Adam Scott co-star.

“Crashing” (HBO, 2017, two discs, eight episodes, deleted scenes, featurettes, HBO special: “Faces and Sounds”). Stand-up comic Pete Holmes created this raunchy sitcom in which he stars as a version of himself, a religious comedian whose wife cheats on him after six years of marriage, forcing him to re-evaluate his life and his comedy. Content warning: It’s HBO. Guests include Artie Lange, T.J. Miller, Gina Gershon and Sarah Silverman.

“Minnie’s Happy Helpers” (Disney Junior, 2017, six episodes, bonus episode). These seven episodes of the current Disney cable channel animated series “Mickey and the Roadster Racers” focus on “The Happy Helpers” — Minnie Mouse and Daisy Duck — as troubleshooting entrepreneurs who are called upon to babysit an egg that’s about to hatch, travel to London to repair Big Ben, plan a luau, etc.

“My Little Pony: Equestria Girls: Magical Movie Night” (Shout! Kids, 2017, three episodes, sing-along). This set of animated cartoons about young girls being transported through a magical mirror to the “My Little Pony” world, includes three half-hour TV specials: “Dance Magic,” “Movie Magic” and “Mirror Magic.”

Chris Hicks is the author of "Has Hollywood Lost Its Mind? A Parent’s Guide to Movie Ratings." He also writes at www.hicksflicks.com and can be contacted at hicks@deseretnews.com.

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