@NCCapitol

Groups make final push to inspire minority voters

Posted November 6
Updated November 7

The minority vote during the 2016 early voting cycle has been one of many hot topics and many groups on Sunday were still trying to boost that vote before Tuesday.
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— With only two days left until Election Day, early voters have turned out in record numbers in North Carolina, but there is still a push to get minority voters to cast their ballots.

The minority vote during the 2016 early voting cycle has been one of many hot topics and many groups on Sunday were still trying to boost that vote before Tuesday.

According to the North Carolina Board of Elections, there are more than 1.5 million registered black voters in the state and 18 million nationwide. Although the nationwide number of black voters has increased over the past decade, political analysts said they don’t expect the same turnout at the polls in comparison to the 2012 election.

That information is not deterring the NAACP.

"We've been scheduling rides with churches and citizens to take people to the polls on Tuesday morning. They will be there bright an early at 6:30 a.m.," said Rev. Portia Rochelle. "We believe that there will be a great turnout on Tuesday. Why? Because we've done our best to educate people on their rights."

When it comes to Hispanic voters, early voting is up 75 percent compared to 2012. According to the Board of Elections, more than 165,000 registered voters are Hispanic, which is 50,000 more than in 2012.

"We just want to get that culture of civic participation more entrenched in our community," said Angeline Echeverria with the group El Pueblo

El Pueblo worked their last day of phone banks on Sunday to get out the vote.

“We hear that the issues they care about are similar to those of other North Carolina voters, so things like education, housing, immigration is clearly a concern for Latino voters,” said Echeverria. “We hear the gamut of the same sort of issues that other North Carolinians care about.”

Echeverria said language barriers are a concern for many Spanish speaking voters at the polls.

Both El Pueblo and the NAACP said part of the challenge in bringing people to the polls has been educating voters following the ruling that state lawmakers had adopted election laws that were intended to be discriminatory.

4 Comments

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  • Pete Muller Nov 7, 11:10 a.m.
    user avatar

    Mr. Tyler. Move to the real world. ID requirements for voting did not get eliminated. It never existed besides a short time that the courts took to strike down yet another illegal attempt by the Republicans to suppress votes. It would be nice if everybody voted in each election, but it is not happening. Or why do you think the Trumpster is chasing event after event these weeks. He knows his target audience has a pretty bad turnout record.

  • Samuel Tyler Nov 7, 11:00 a.m.
    user avatar

    They shouldn't have to encourage minorities to vote. They already made it easier by eliminating ID. I bet no one encouraged MR. Muller to run to the polls. If you care about the direction your country is headed you will vote without being asked, begged or told. Plain and simple.

  • Pete Muller Nov 7, 10:33 a.m.
    user avatar

    Mr. Point for creativity for you. How do you come up with all the nonsense you air out in these forums? I know, the Trump campaign is pretty void on facts, but you should really send your resume to the Trump TV endeavor. Just make sure you don't quit your day job. If history is any indicator, Trump TV would be short lived.

  • Byrd Ferguson Nov 6, 9:59 p.m.
    user avatar

    [liberal] Groups Make Final Push...