Local News

Group home suspended, fined after 12-year-old resident killed

Posted April 9

Khalil Toddm, 12, died March 10, 2014, after being hit by a car outside The Lighthouse, at 1521 Ranch Road in Clayton.

— The company that owns a group home that housed a 12-year-old boy who was hit and killed by a car in March has been fined $10,000 by the state and temporarily prevented from admitting new residents.

In letters and a report obtained by WRAL News through a public records request, the state Department of Health and Human Services issued the fine and suspension to KMG Holdings Inc., which owns The Lighthouse on Ranch Road in Clayton.

Among the citations, the state said the group home failed to ensure that medications were administered to one client, did not keep current medication records for two clients and the 12-year-old, did not maintain safe and clean grounds and did not provide continuous supervision for two clients.

The facility has 20 days to appeal the suspension and 30 days to appeal the fine.

Khalil Todd, 12, was hit by a car on Ranch Road on March 10 after he ran out of The Lighthouse, where he had been admitted for behavioral issues.

According to the report, Todd had an argument with a staff member, ran down a hill and into a ditch, then went across the street. A staffer who was chasing Todd ran back to the facility to alert authorities. By the time they returned, they found Todd had been hit. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

"Staff immediately ran back, called [Todd] again and noticed a car pulled up to the shoulder," the report said. The employee "approached the car, while calling [Todd] at the same time, and asked the driver what was wrong. The driver stated 'I think I hit something' and then he pointed to the ground and staff noticed [Todd] in the ditch."

Neighbors said Todd was wearing all black and frequently saw him in the road, carrying a big stick.

The Lighthouse is a Level III residential treatment facility for young men with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Level III facilities are highly structured and supervised environments.

Neighbors said they've seen residents playing in the street.

"We just kept saying that something is going to happen, and pitifully, it did," said Phil Langford, who lives near the home.

Johnston County deputies have responded to the group home 213 times since 2006. The majority of calls were for neighbors reporting disturbances, residents going missing or trouble with patients.

8 Comments

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  • SusanBAnthony9 Apr 10, 4:23 p.m.

    I can't imagine working in that kind of environment. Takes a special kind of person.

  • joefurloughski Apr 10, 2:17 p.m.

    The people of NC are getting ripped off by these group homes. There is one here in my neighborhood and one of the "patients" got out and stole and vandalized my property. Taxpayer money is funding people to buy real estate in residential neighborhoods and open a group home. They make the house payments with taxpayer money they get for running one of these homes. Over time, the group home owner owns the property. What a scam.

  • mam Apr 10, 2:05 p.m.

    A life should certainly be worth more than $10; I know I put a much higher value on my childrens lives. I agree with Brandy; as a parent you have a responsibility to protect your children at any cost, in any situation they are in. Obtaining help in for children in this state is challenging, but can be done with a lot of time and effort. I only hope that other parents with children in programs stand up for themselves when they have a problem with these programs and do something about it.

  • 678devilish Apr 10, 11:05 a.m.

    Where was these "adults" who was supposed to be watching out for this young man and others? The did the right thing in suspending the home and fining them. May other group home as well as this one learn from this.

  • brandy213122 Apr 10, 10:16 a.m.

    In no way am I saying that the death of her son is her fault, its the adults who were supposed to be monitoring these children. But I have seen in other news stories that she has had issues with this home. If so, why did she keep him there?

  • brandy213122 Apr 10, 10:14 a.m.

    I hate to play devil's advocate on this one but if the mom had concerns about this home, why didn't she fight tooth and nail to get her son in a better home?? Why are the issues just now being brought up. I have two Autistic children and I would have rather had resources that would have allowed me to kee my child at home than in a home that appears to have had safety issues.

  • dwr1964 Apr 10, 9:54 a.m.

    Pretty good chance that the adults/supervisors will be looking for new employment.

  • Well I. D'Clare Apr 9, 7:50 p.m.

    "Among the citations, the state said the group home failed to ensure that medications were administered to one client, did not keep current medication records for two clients and the 12-year-old, did not maintain safe and clean grounds and did not provide continuous supervision for two clients."

    I suspected such as this.

    Also, surprised tall fences aren't required around facilities that house troubled people like this. Sure, it wouldn't stop someone bent on getting out, but it might slow them down long enough that they could be apprehended before they got hurt or killed.

    Also, if these children were at any time allowed to play right in the street, some adult(s) at that home need to have their heads examined.