Education

Granville County superintendent resigns, will be paid $318,000

Posted June 11

Granville County Schools Superintendent Tim Farley talks with WRAL News at his Oxford home on June 5, 2014.

— Granville County Schools Superintendent Tim Farley has resigned and will receive a $300,000 severance payment, plus a one-time annual supplement of $18,000, the school board announced Wednesday night.

Farley's last official day will be June 30, but he has opted to take personal leave until then and will not be back in the office, school board members said. Assistant Superintendent Dorwin Howard has been named interim superintendent.

“The personnel actions taken tonight with respect to Dr. Farley and the appointment of Dr. Howard as acting superintendent have been taken in the best interests of the Granville County Schools and its teachers, staff, students, and parents," the school board said in a statement. "By taking these actions tonight, the board seeks to refocus the school system on its mission to provide the best possible education for the children of Granville County.”

Farley's resignation stems from an audit released in May citing problems with how the school system handled contracts for top administrators, including Farley and Associate Superintendent Allan Jordan.

The audit found that the full school board "did not always take formal action" to approve, amend or extend the contracts and some board members were "surprised to learn the details" of the contracts, including what top administrators were being paid.

About 100 community members attended Wednesday's school board meeting, which was held at Northern Granville Middle School to accommodate the large crowd. Many in the audience clapped, shouted and gave a standing ovation after Farley's resignation was announced. 

Bruce Parrish, whose children attend Granville County Schools, was one who applauded the decision. Shortly before Wednesday's meeting, he stood outside the school holding a sign that questioned Farley's salary.

"I want those responsible, they need to excuse themselves," Parrish said, calling Farley's salary "outrageous."

Not everyone agreed with the decision. Pastor Ronnie Morton brought about a dozen children from his church to hold signs in support of the district administration. He said people are not taking into account the good work Farley has done.

"Our kids' grades are going up," he said. "We need to stay the course."

In an interview at his home last week, Farley said he did nothing wrong and had no plans to resign

"The audit, it's a horrible document. It's factually incorrect," he said. "I'm frustrated because I didn't do anything wrong. I'm not guilty of anything, so I'm going to stay and fight."

Board members questioned Farley's salary after WRAL.com posted a story last August about the salaries and contracts of the state's 115 public school superintendents.

As of July 2013, Farley made nearly $193,000 a year, making him the second highest paid superintendent in the state with fewer than 25,000 students, according to the audit. Granville County Schools has about 8,600 students.

76 Comments

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  • remer54 Jun 12, 6:28 p.m.

    He's not a CEO and he does not make even close to CEO pay. He a school super that makes way to much money.

  • justcommonsense Jun 12, 4:49 p.m.

    Take some time and learn a little about local government before you start commenting. The... View More

    — Posted by JustaThought2

    Bingo! Because mob mentality rules and everyone is out with the pitchforks, tar and feathers. They don't get that Supers and others are in fact working at the whim of ... gasp.... POLITICIANS... ie the ELECTED school board members who often (most often) are not educators. They and they alone make the decisions around contracts, salaries, hiring and firing.

    The majority posting here for his head on platter would have gladly accepted the salary and all other conditions of the contract without a qualm.

  • btneast Jun 12, 3:15 p.m.

    The BOE is to blame for this mess, hopefully the voters will remember when election time comes around.

    THAT is the problem, and sadly, come election time, most voters will look at the names on the school board ballot and have no clue who any of them are or what they stand for......and they will just pick the names they recognize or that sound good. The bad situation our schools are in are the fault of apathetic or clueless voters. You get the government you allow.

  • Ven Jun 12, 2:41 p.m.

    WOW - talk about trying to bury a story! This was a typical 'hook-up' between known parties, shameful (and YES, I would've taken the deal too).

  • still a heel Jun 12, 2:03 p.m.

    yes he was paid way to much, just like every other superintendent in the state. The BOE is to blame for this mess, hopefully the voters will remember when election time comes around. Two were just voted off in May. I don't think Farley was doing such a great job at all but I also think he is being made a scapegoat by this board covering there a**. They spend money like there is no tomorrow on lawyers and everything but our children and the real educators, our teachers!

  • issymayake Jun 12, 1:07 p.m.

    Issymayake, there are thousands out there looking for work with your degrees in hand and would... View More

    — Posted by wayneboyd

    Perhaps, but still people over the age of 25 with a college degree are employed, as evidenced by an UE rate of under 4%.

    If you're in that bad of a position, you need one or all of these three things:
    1) Patience
    2) A better resume
    3) More experience

    You may not get to be a superintendent, but if you work within the system, and are willing to take on more responsibility you can achieve that as well.

  • wasone Jun 12, 12:34 p.m.

    As in all N.C. School systems the Superintendent position has become a money pit. We in Sampson County have too school systems to deal with, the Clinton City system as well as the county system. Twice the money and twice the problem. One of the poorest counties in the state, we are now deeply in debt for new schools built by former County commissioners who decided to Not run for reelection

  • Paladin2 Jun 12, 12:28 p.m.

    For all you whiners - you would have taken the severance package if it had been contractually available to you as a result of the board and others throwing you under the bus with no cause.

  • davidhartman Jun 12, 12:27 p.m.

    Just as a FYI, the payout is written into most all superintendent's contracts in the beginning.... View More

    — Posted by btneast

    This idea is based on the assumption that people employed in the private sector have better job... View More

    — Posted by The Anti Hans

    +1,000!

    These contractual obligations are a huge waste of taxpayer money.

    Working for a BOD is no different whatsoever than 'at will' employment the private sector abides by. Any board members approving such ridiculous measures should be removed from office.

    This guy can sit on his duff doing nothing after being handed $318k of TAXPAYER money, and the mere fact that school boards are constantly whining about how little money they have sickens me.

    Wake did the same thing a few years ago with Tata giving him a quarter of a million dollars to leave, then cried they needed more money. The naïve liberal voters should have sent these stooges packing, instead they simply encourage this behavior by giving them even more money! Crazy!!!

  • btneast Jun 12, 12:26 p.m.

    $18G in one check would fix a lot of problems for me! I can't fathom 300G. that's crazy for anyone in public education.

    Keep in mind, its for the balance of time he was contracted to work originally. Yes, there is a LOT of waste in the administration of school systems. Why do you think teachers are getting advanced degrees? It's so they can get into administration and make way more money. To be fair, superintendent's are on par with a CEO....and a CEO managing this many people would be paid similarly. Some of you are really out of touch with current pay scales.

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