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WRAL SmartShopper

General Mills reverses legal changes and issues an apology

Posted April 21

General Mills cereals

As I posted last week, General Mills recently updated their website to indicate that if you have done any number of activities linking you to General Mills and then you have a problem with their product, you have to go through "informal negotiations or through binding arbitration." BUT, they backtracked over the weekend and removed the legal wording that basically prevents consumers from suing.

According to an article on CNN Money, General Mills reversed the policy after consumer outrage. General Mills spokeswoman Kirstie Foster wrote, "We're sorry we even started down this path."  They have now gone back to the prior terms and have removed the wording requiring arbitration. 

Interesting turn of events, don't you think?

 

Here is the original post I made about the new legal terms last week:

General Mills recently updated their website to indicate that if you have done any number of activities linking you to General Mills and then you have a problem with their product, you have to go through  "informal negotiations or through binding arbitration.” No lawsuit for you!

An article from Couponsinthenews.com, quotes the new General Mills policy which states, "“By using our websites, joining our sites as a member, joining our online community, subscribing to our email newsletters, downloading or printing a digital coupon, entering a sweepstakes or contest, redeeming a promotional offer, or otherwise participating in any other General Mills offering, you are agreeing to these terms.” 

Basically, they are claiming that if you have just about any contact with them, you can't sure for any reason.  The article indicates that The New York Times broke the story and that General Mills has been trying to downplay the new legal stipulations ever since.  They have since clarified that their online communities are only those on their website and not sites like Facebook. 

Will this actually hold up in court? Who knows. The fact they they are trying to get out of having any real legal responsibility for wrongdoing is certainly not giving consumers that warm & fuzzy feeling.  A number of their Facebook "fans" are no longer fans and are making their position regarding this new legal stance very clear.

Will you "unlike" them on Facebook or stop using General Mills products because of this?

4 Comments

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  • Daria Apr 21, 3:49 p.m.

    It was a foolish idea no doubt by some lawyer who thought they could slip in a little change without consumers being upset. I am glad they quickly removed it.

  • Faye Prosser -WRAL Smart Shopper Apr 21, 10:56 a.m.

    Silly consumers, trix are for lawyers!

    — Posted by SaveEnergyMan

    Not that was funny!!

  • privilegesrevoked Apr 21, 10:45 a.m.

    I still don't believe it would have held up in court - but Gen Mills doesn't need all the ill will they created, which will no doubt still lose them customers just because they had the audacity to try it.

  • SaveEnergyMan Apr 21, 9:17 a.m.

    Silly consumers, trix are for lawyers!