Go Ask Mom

Go Ask Mom

Free workshop offered for parents of teen drivers

Posted October 6, 2014
Updated October 7, 2014

I shared some tips for parents of teen drivers last week after Wake County lost two teens, who had died in separate car crashes when another teen was behind the wheel.

Matt Thompson, manager of marketing and public relations for the Safety and Health Council of North Carolina, told me about his group's Alive at 25 program, which is held twice a week in Raleigh for teens and young adults ages 15 to 24.

Young drivers with tickets often are sent to complete the course, but Thompson's group actually cuts the price from $60 to $25 to encourage teens who haven't gotten a ticket yet to take the course. The group also offers free programs for parents, churches and other community groups.

"The key is changing behavior," he told me. "The key is making them more aware."

I am excited to report that that post has sent many parents and groups Thompson's way. He said he's gotten a huge response and is scheduling sessions all over the region now. That's wonderful.

The Safety and Health Council of North Carolina also is scheduling a free program for parents this month. The Alive at 25 Parent Workshop will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Oct. 27, at the council's Raleigh and Charlotte offices. Refreshments will be provided.

The session will cover topics such as why teens are at risk while driving with statistical data showing that teens are the most vulnerable age group on the road; the important role parents play in guiding their teens to be safer drivers; traffic laws relating to young drivers; and setting expectations and consequences for young drivers.

"The presenters in both our Raleigh and Charlotte sessions have extensive knowledge and experience in teen driving training and education," Thompson wrote me in an email. "The sessions will be interactive between presenters and parents and will also utilize two brief, but instructive, videos."

Parents must register for the workshop.

The Raleigh office is at 3739 National Drive, Suite 125, in Raleigh. Call 919-719-9818 or email matt@safetync.org.

The Charlotte office is at 2709 Water Ridge Parkway, Suite 120. Call 704-644-4218 or email chipmcd@safetync.org.

The council is the state chapter of the National Safety Council, a nonprofit chartered by Congress that focuses on health and safety issues. The group is one of the first in the country to develop training for drivers after they get their licenses.

If you are interested in organizing a teen driving program for teens or parents or would like to learn more about how to sign your teen up for the Alive at 25 program, email Thompson at matt@safetync.org. He would love to hear from you.

4 Comments

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  • Kat Sieber Oct 8, 2014
    user avatar

    In Johnston County my daughter had Alive at 25 with her driver's Ed Class at the high school.

  • btneast Oct 7, 2014

    Why not a class for these teenagers?
    Maybe go back and read the article again......it IS for teens as well as parents

  • A person Oct 7, 2014

    Common-sense can not be earned during a workshop. Raising children requires common-sense,, not attending a free workshop so someone can have a warm fuzzy feeling and say they did something

  • 678devilish Oct 7, 2014

    Parents will not be with their teenagers when they are out driving. Why not a class for these teenagers? Its just following the rules of the roads and highways. Many don't do that as well as parents and other adults. You see this all the time. Teenagers don't have that experience. Wake up parents and realize this before you purchase a car or hand the keys over to them. Be wise in your decision making if you want to see your teenager grow up and get married.