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Duke Medicine: Lose weight while you sleep? Yes, sleep is that powerful

Posted February 25, 2013

Late-night munchies can wreck havoc on your diet plans so the next time they strike, hit the sack instead.

The more sleep you get, the less likely you are to succumb to delicious temptation, and the faster you’ll lose weight.

More studies are showing a link between sleep deprivation and weight gain, says Meredith Barbour, MD, a family medicine physician at Duke Primary Care Brier Creek.

“Lack of sleep triggers the release of hormones that stimulate hunger and appetite, especially for those high-calorie, carbohydrate-dense foods like cookies, chips and ice cream,” she says. Going to sleep is the best way to satisfy that craving.

Sleep deprivation occurs more regularly in people who routinely get less than seven hours of shut-eye at night.

“Generally speaking, adults should aim for seven to eight hours of sleep per night,” Barbour recommends.

For more on sleep and weight gain, read the full post at DukeHealth.org. Duke Medicine, Go Ask Mom's sponsor, offers health tips every Tuesday.

1 Comment

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  • Huey Feb 26, 10:11 a.m.

    So, next time I get an urge for the munchies I should take a nap? Now I am fat and I do have sleep apnea so maybe there is something to this after all. Needs more study.