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Duke Energy implodes boilers at retired coal plant in Goldsboro

Posted June 20

Duke Energy Progress on June 20, 2014, imploded boilers at the retired H. F. Lee Steam Plant in Goldsboro, setting the way for the utility to begin restoring the site as part of a broader move toward cleaner energy sources. (Courtesy of Duke Energy ProgressO

— Duke Energy Progress on Friday imploded three boilers at a retired coal plant in Goldsboro, setting the way for the utility to begin restoring the site as part of a broader move toward cleaner energy sources.

The implosion at the 63-year-old H.F. Lee Steam Plant is the second at the site. In December, it imploded twin smokestacks.

Restoration of the site involves filling, grading and seeding the land by mid-2015.

Duke Energy's investment in five new combined-cycle and clean coal plants, including the one in Goldsboro, totals $9 billion. Because of the investment, the company was able to retire seven of its 14 coal plants in the state.

The H.F. Lee coal plant began operating in 1951 and has been replaced by a new 920-megawatt natural gas plant on-site that began serving customers in 2012.

"This demolition event is bittersweet, from a historical perspective," said Millie Chalk, Duke Energy's district manager. "It marks the end of a plant that has reliably served the region for more than 60 years, while also symbolizing a 'passing of the torch' to the new natural gas plant. From the environmental perspective, the transition is very positive."

Check out the implosion below:

8 Comments

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  • russtigg Jun 20, 5:17 p.m.

    And how much dust and dirt did THAT send into that nearby water???
    smh

    Prayers for any flora or... View More

    — Posted by Well I. D'Clare

    Demolition is monitored. I know, I did the monitoring. Very little debris was spread as water... View More

    — Posted by russtigg

    -

    I know what you're saying and believe you, but you can see the dust rising from the structures... View More

    — Posted by Well I. D'Clare

    It looks worse than it really is. Also, the river is rather close at that section of the plant, but not close enough to be impacted. More debris was thrown in the air in December during the stack implosions and my area samples were not overloaded. The stacks still had some fly ash in them and they also fell into the former coal storage area. No material left the site and there was no environmental impact.

  • tobywilliamson1973 Jun 20, 5:12 p.m.

    I hope no wildlife was injured. Did they canvas the area and remove things such as rabbits and box turtles?

  • 68_dodge_polara Jun 20, 5:03 p.m.

    complain complain complain...

  • Well I. D'Clare Jun 20, 5:03 p.m.

    And how much dust and dirt did THAT send into that nearby water???
    smh

    Prayers for any flora or... View More

    — Posted by Well I. D'Clare

    Demolition is monitored. I know, I did the monitoring. Very little debris was spread as water... View More

    — Posted by russtigg

    -

    I know what you're saying and believe you, but you can see the dust rising from the structures as they're falling, and you know that spread out over the area, including over the water, before settling.

  • russtigg Jun 20, 4:54 p.m.

    And how much dust and dirt did THAT send into that nearby water???
    smh

    Prayers for any flora or... View More

    — Posted by Well I. D'Clare

    Demolition is monitored. I know, I did the monitoring. Very little debris was spread as water trucks are utilized. Also, prior to implosion, hazardous materials are identified and removed.
    Yes, a portion of the implosion failed.

  • European American Jun 20, 4:53 p.m.

    Destroying evidence of another problem.

  • pappy1 Jun 20, 4:25 p.m.

    Looks like part of the demolition failed.

  • Well I. D'Clare Jun 20, 4:21 p.m.

    And how much dust and dirt did THAT send into that nearby water???
    smh

    Prayers for any flora or fauna nearby.