Go Ask Mom

Go Ask Mom

Destination: 'Flight of the Butterflies 3D'

Posted December 27, 2012

"Flight of the Butterflies 3D" is as much science lesson as it is a mystery.

The 40-minute documentary, now showing at the IMAX theater at Marbles Kids Museum, follows the story of Dr. Fred Urquhart, a Canadian scientist, as he unravels the mystery of where millions of Monarchs butterflies go for the winter.

Urquhart's interest, the movie shows us, begins as a child and continued throughout his life. You see scenes of him chasing butterflies in his youth, trying to tag them as a young researcher and then, with his wife, leading an effort across North America to track the insects.

It also follows "Dana," a Monarch, along with her daughter, granddaughter and great granddaughter and the "Super Generation" that makes the ultimate 1,245 mile journey across North America to Mexico. There, millions of Monarchs huddle together, creating a truly amazing site.

The story culminates with Urquhart and his wife, with the help of another couple, finally discovering where all those butterflies go. It's a moving scene, which happened in real life in 1975, as we see Urquhart finally getting the answer to the question of his life.

I took my seven-year-old to see the movie. Together, we've shared an interest in butterflies, starting with the very early days when she was a baby and I'd carry her over to our butterfly garden. She'd squeal each time one got anywhere close to her.

The movie moved us far past our garden, across a continent and to Mexico. It tells a fascinating tale that will make both of us take another look when we see Monarchs flitting around in our own yard.

I'd recommend it for grade schoolers and up. For details and showtimes, click here.

Go Ask Mom features places to take kids every Friday. For more ideas, check our park and playground reviews and posts on Triangle family destinations.

Comments

This story is closed for comments. Comments on WRAL.com news stories are accepted and moderated between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Oldest First
View all