Weather

Clouds, patchy rain remain as system moves off NC coast

Posted April 27, 2013
Updated April 29, 2013

— A wide band of rain that moved across North Carolina early Monday was heading off the coast at lunchtime, after giving most of the state a good soaking that will help keep temperatures below normal for the next few days.

A low-pressure system pushed rain into the region from the west overnight. What started as a sprinkle turned into a steady, heavy downpour by the time most residents awoke Monday.

Raleigh-Durham International Airport measured 1.83 inches of rain by noon. Fayetteville had 1.71 inches; Southern Pines recorded 2.78 inches; Louisburg had 2.82 inches; and Smithfield had 1.94 inches.

The rain was tapering off, but cloud cover and patchy showers will remain throughout the day, forecasters said.

"Don't be surprised if you hear a rumble of thunder, but we're not talking about severe weather with this system by any means," WRAL meteorologist Elizabeth Gardner said.

The rest of the week will bring more rain, she said.

"This is going to be a very unsettled period for us with some showers on and off," Gardner said. "We may get a little break on Tuesday, but we're back into the showers on Wednesday. And that may linger into Thursday, too."

Monday's high in Raleigh is expected to be about 68 degrees. The highs will remain around 70 degrees for the rest of the week, which is below normal for this time of year.

The record high for this week is 94 degrees.

16 Comments

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  • simplelogic Apr 29, 1:04 p.m.

    Yes, I can see that a term like "mild" could mean different things to different people, but I've heard it used to describe climate and weather my whole life (a LONG time). It's nothing new, and language being what it is, I think after all this time it should be considered an acceptable adjective in a general sense; i.e. not extreme with regards to temperature, or, for that matter, storminess. At any rate, I hope you have a good week, with no plans to work on your tan. :-)

  • Unbroken Apr 29, 12:32 p.m.

    @simplelogic

    Actually, I LOVE weather forecasting, models, etc. My comment truly was aimed at whoever wrote the article as opposed to the meteorologists themselves.

    I mean, I get what they are saying, I just thought personally that it was a little bit of sloppy writing and it amazes me what passes here and on the internet in general these days. I will also say that I by no means am a shining example of perfect spelling and grammar but then again, it ain't ma job.

    I am originally from NY, my wife from FL. Although I would be fine wearing shorts today, she was last seen wearing a heavy coat. So ironically we have this type of discussion all the time, my definition of "mild" isn't the same as hers.

    And yes, I hate it when people bash the forecasters as well. I mean, it isn't like they are the ones ordering up the weather they we are (or aren't) getting. It also isn't like they are intentionally botching the forecast just for shizz and giggles.

  • simplelogic Apr 29, 12:15 p.m.

    I wonder where jblake is today, anyway - he found Friday's forecast of rain for Sunday absolutely ridiculous.

  • simplelogic Apr 29, 12:09 p.m.

    No problem, Unbroken. I just get so tired of some people who seem to have nothing better to do than criticize weather forecasters who for the most part do a pretty good job considering that it isn't an exact science. I apparently mistook you for one of them. As for the definition of "mild", a reference to weather appears in just about every dictionary as the opposite of "extreme", so if you consider "mild" subjective, I guess you'd also have to say the same about "extreme". Do you? For the record, I stay away from heavy machinery as much as possible. :-)

  • Unbroken Apr 29, 11:53 a.m.

    "Since you also chose to not stay in bed this morning, at least do us the favor of not operating any heavy machinery today.
    Unbroken"

    I apologize for that comment....

  • Hans Apr 29, 11:30 a.m.

    "Perhaps that was the case where you lived, but not in the Triangle. I have NO TIME FOR YOUR STUPIDITY." - seankelly15
    April 29, 2013 10:11 a.m.

    Ummmm.... it was sunny and warm Saturday.

  • Unbroken Apr 29, 11:14 a.m.

    I am bashing the "Web Editor," not the "weather-guessers." This is something that is not limited to this particular article. I will let you debate with yourself on the appropriateness of tagging a subjective term to a scientific/meteorological measurement. You know, that whole "logic" thing.

    Since you also chose to not stay in bed this morning, at least do us the favor of not operating any heavy machinery today.

  • simplelogic Apr 29, 10:12 a.m.

    "Mild for perhaps our friends to the north, but not for NC if it is truly "cooler than normal" as they have so astutely reported."

    LOL! Have you been outside this morning? It's not hot. It's not cold. It's MILD. I don't know where you got the idea that "mild" and "cooler than normal" are mutually exclusive, but if that's the best criticism you can come up with to bash the weather-guessers this morning, you probably should have just stayed in bed. Actually, for NC during most of the year including spring, summer and fall, "cooler than normal" and "mild" are synonymous.

    I'll keep my handle, thanks.

  • seankelly15 Apr 29, 10:11 a.m.

    NoTimeForStupidity - "Like Saturday, no clouds, no rain, all sunburn."

    Perhaps that was the case where you lived, but not in the Triangle. I have NO TIME FOR YOUR STUPIDITY.

  • Unbroken Apr 29, 9:23 a.m.

    "Yup. High 60's to low 70's IS mild. Also cooler than normal. Time for a coffee break? Go for it.
    simplelogic"

    Mild for perhaps our friends to the north, but not for NC if it is truly "cooler than normal" as they have so astutely reported.

    You may want to rethink your handle.

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