banner
Business

Cumberland leaders to talk incentives for chicken processor

Posted September 15, 2014

Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— The Cumberland County Board of Commissioners and Fayetteville City Council were expected to meet Monday night to talk about an incentive plan they might offer to lure the nation's third-largest chicken processor to the area.

Sanderson Farms is looking at building a plant in the Cedar Creek Business Center, a county-owned 480-acre industrial park east of Interstate 95, that could bring as many as 1,000 jobs to the area. The company would also contract with about 80 chicken farms in a five-county area to supply the plant, company officials have said.

Residents who live nearby, however, have been vocal against building the plant, citing concerns about the smell, noise, pollution and potential water contamination that might be associated with it.

For 30 years, Pat Ann Matthews has lived on Evans Dairy Road, about a mile from Cedar Creek Road.

"We are concerned and upset at what this might possibly do to the Cape Fear River," she said. "We know what it's going to do. We've been told (by an environmentalist) the Cape Fear is already in trouble."

County commissioners said they had similar reservations until they visited a Sanderson plant in Kinston, which they described as clean and state-of-the-art.

"I have stayed neutral, and I've listened to both sides, and when the time comes, I will definitely be ready to vote," Cumberland County Commissioner Marshall Faircloth said.

But some people think the plant's a done deal.

Matthews says what seems to be working well at the Kinston plant may not work well in Fayetteville.

"You're not comparing apples to apples with this community and the Kinston community. Not at all," she said.

7 Comments

This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • dead1cat2 Sep 16, 2014

    "incentives" means "bribes" by business and board members.

  • btneast Sep 16, 2014

    If you think that poultry plants don't smell bad you should take the time to ride down to Lumber Bridge and experience the "not smelling bad"

    Well, I grew up about 4 blocks from one.....and that was many years ago, before environmental responsibility was as big of an issue as it is now, so it is even less of an issue now than it was then. Lots of manufacturing facilities give off odors ....ever been within 10 miles of a pulp mill? How about a coffee processing facility....the initial processing of raw coffee does NOT smell like a coffee shop....more like burnt rubber. Tire manufacturers have a very unpleasant smell too.

  • justabumer Sep 16, 2014

    View quoted thread



    If you think that poultry plants don't smell bad you should take the time to ride down to Lumber Bridge and experience the "not smelling bad" there. Especially when the plant is dumping the waste water.

  • btneast Sep 16, 2014

    These plants should be way out in the sticks, miles from the nearest house. No Corporation has the rights to ruin the property values of its neighbors.1) This area IS very rural.
    2) Its going into an industrial park that has been there for many years, not in the countryside next to houses
    3) Poultry processing plants do not smell bad. Poultry farms do, paper mills do, feed mills do....

  • Anita Woody Sep 15, 2014

    It's good to see that the leadership is working to bring in jobs. This area must diversify it's job pool to survive, and with a native population that is highly uneducated, these are they type of jobs that will help people and the community.

  • Grand Union Sep 15, 2014

    These plants should be way out in the sticks, miles from the nearest house. No Corporation has the rights to ruin the property values of its neighbors.

  • justabumer Sep 15, 2014

    It would be interesting to know how many of the commissioners live in the area which will be affected by the plant. I'm pretty that the answer would be-none.