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Chatham OKs old raises for county workers

Posted December 14, 2010

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— The Chatham County Board of Commissioners on Monday approved paying county employees the raises they earned two years ago but had to forgo because of budget cuts.

The raises will be paid out as lump-sum 2 percent bonuses this month, costing the county $312,119, officials said.

“We felt that this was a contractual obligation that should be met,” board Chairman Brian Bock said in a statement. “County employees who met their targeted performance levels deserve to receive what they earned by contract."

The bonuses will be paid out of a reserve fund and won't affect the county budget, officials said.

Some employees might earn more than 2 percent if their supervisors determine that they exceeded the requirements of their pay-for-performance plan, officials said. That money would be paid as a one-time bonus before the end of March 2011, and officials said that extra money wouldn't exceed $86,362.

“Providing bonuses instead of salary increases is not the ideal option, but it represents a compromise to provide some relief to county employees for the work they successfully completed two years ago," Bock said.

The county hasn't had pay-for-performance plans for county workers since the 2008-09 fiscal year because of tight budgets, officials said.

Also Monday, the commissioners voted to go along with a state law giving developers an extra year to meet the conditions of zoning and environmental permits. The move reversed a decision made by the previous board.

"Anything that may stand in the way of fair and proper commercial and residential development, especially in our current economic climate, is disconcerting," Joe Glasson, chairman of the Chatham County Economic Development Corp., said in a statement. "Many developers stand ready to put into place their previously approved plans, but the current primary barrier to good quality economic development financing is that the credit market has been virtually non-existent.”

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  • Raleigh Boys Dec 14, 2010

    Diane Reid, can you fix this?

  • wildcat Dec 14, 2010

    WHAT ARE THEY GOING TO DO ABOUT THE BAD JOB SITUATION IN CHATHAM? THE SILER CITY COMMISSIONERS WILL WALK AWAY WHEN YOU ASK ABOUT THE JOB SITUATION. TIME TO VOTE THEM OUT TOO.

  • nrosie09 Dec 14, 2010

    Perhaps the new county commissioners can look at the impact fees charged potential home builders, reduce them to a reasonable rate (or eliminate them) as the fees are a serious disincentive. When a person has to spend thousands of dollars right out of the gate, before they are able to begin the permitting process, they are going to look elsewhere (like Lee County, just to the south, which does not charge an impact fee) to build, and Chatham County loses far more in taxes than it would gain from the impact fee. I would also love to see an accounting of exactly where the impact fee is deposited, since the premise is that it is to offset future school growth---as a long time Chatham County resident, I can tell you for free it is a high tax, no-service mess. I can't think of a county employee (and I know quite a few) who merits any kind of raise.

  • nighttrain2010 Dec 14, 2010

    >>but the current primary barrier to good quality economic development financing is that the credit market has been virtually non-existent

    Of course. That's why the lots for million dollar homes on Mt. Gilead Church Road have sat empty for three years. Couldn't have been it was a bad idea to begin with...

    >>it represents a compromise to provide some relief to county employees for the work they successfully completed two years ago," Bock said.

    You mean their jobs?

  • Raleigh Boys Dec 14, 2010

    Oh boy, Mr. John Sauls, animal catcher, can trade in his 20 year old car now.