Business

Google delays community ultra-fast broadband network choice

Posted December 16, 2010

— Thirty-six groups from North Carolina have applied for consideration to be selected for Google's proposed ultra-fast broadband project, but they won't find out if they were selected until next year.

Google's new top networking executive says more than 1,100 applications were made across the U.S. , which is a major reason why the choice is being pushed back to 2011.

Milo Medin, a networking veteran whom Google hired to oversee the proposed ultra-fast broadband network in a select group of communities, wrote in a blog that the review process will continue a bit longer than expected.

So whether Raleigh City Councilman Bonner Gaylord will have to, as promised, name his sons Larry [Page] and Sergey [Brin] after Google's co-founders won't be known for a while.

Google has done some preliminary work in testing the fiber optic-based technology that promises to deliver broadband services 100 times faster than current technology, Medin noted. Among the efforts is one on Google's headquarters campus and another is an 850-home "beta" at Stanford University.

"I’m excited for us to bring our ultra high-speed network to a community," he wrote in a Google blog.

"We had planned to announce our selected community or communities by the end of this year, but the level of interest was incredible – nearly 1,100 communities across the country responded to our announcement – and exceeded our expectations. While we’re moving ahead full steam on this project, we’re not quite ready to make that announcement.

"We’re sorry for this delay, but we want to make sure we get this right. To be clear, we’re not re-opening our selection process – we simply need more time to decide than we’d anticipated. Stay tuned for an announcement in early 2011."

Google set off a stampede of applications and the naming offers with its announcement of the project in February.

The following North Carolina communities and groups representing various areas have applied:

  • Apex
  • Asheville
  • Burke County
  • Cary
  • Chapel Hill and Carrboro
  • Concord
  • County of Stanly
  • Durham
  • Gastonia & Gaston County
  • Greensboro
  • Greenville
  • Harrisburg
  • Holly Springs
  • Huntersville
  • Leland
  • Lenoir
  • Lenoir, Hickory, Newton, Conover
  • Lenoir/Hickory, Caldwell and Catawba Counties
  • MidLand
  • Mooresville, Davidson, Cornelius
  • Morrisville
  • Orange County
  • Pittsboro
  • Raleigh
  • Robeson County
  • Rocky Mount
  • Rutherford County
  • Salisbury
  • Sanford
  • Southport
  • Union County
  • Waynesville
  • Wesley Chapel
  • Wilmington
  • Winston-Salem
  • Woodfin Board
3 Comments

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  • GetRight Dec 16, 4:13 p.m.

    My TW RoadRunner is the same price it's been for 7 years. Maybe I've been shafted from the beginning and you're just starting to get it?

    I pay $41.95 and RR is the ONLY TW service I use.

  • -Enter Screen Name- Dec 16, 2:05 p.m.

    @Raige: There's also AT&T's U-Verse, though availability is VERY limited. I keep hoping that either U-Verse or FIoS will come to my neighborhood soon. I'd LOVE to drop TW.

    It'd be nice if TW actually came up to the 21st century for the prices they charge.

  • Codepwned Dec 16, 1:57 p.m.

    Anything to replace Time-Warner. They upped their price AGAIN and there isn't any comparable broadband at their speeds other than DSL. That's a whole other problem.